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  • Fruits of My Labor

    One of my favorite things about living in Panama is the constant supply of amazing fresh fruit. With Panama’s changing, but ever-warm seasons, there’s always something newly-ripe and ready to eat.

    Some options (like the mystery fruit below) might look a little daunting at first sight, but I’ve yet to find a fruit in Panama that wouldn’t make me go back to the tree for seconds.

    Panamanian fruit

    I fortuitously arrived in Panama at the height of mango season, which may have been the biggest contributing factor to me falling so quickly in love with Panama. During my first visit to the island, I literally got hit over the head with an enormous green mango that dropped from a tree, ready to eat.

    I was in heaven.

    I also learned quickly that any more than 3 mangoes consumed in one sitting can cause a bit of a stomachache. Stick to 2.

    During my time here I have also had the opportunity to try papaya, melons of every variety, maracuyá (passionfruit), guava, guanábana, and a few others simply handed to me by locals that I may never know the name of.

    I’ve also sampled cacao straight from the pod, plantains, yucca, and limes and lemons from our organic orchard on Palenque. I feel like every trip there’s a new and exciting locally-grown delicacy to try.

    If you’re thinking about a visit to Isla Palenque soon, you can sample pineapple, mamón chino, and the ever-abundant fresh coconut just like our Open House guests did!

    Panamanian fruit

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    Post by Laura Moller

    Laura loves living abroad and spends every free moment soaking in the Panama sunshine and finding new spots to explore. Meet Laura>>

    More posts by Laura Moller

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    One Response

    1. Emily Kinskey Emily says:

      Definitely planning my next trip to Isla Palenque during mango season — they are too good to miss!

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        [post_content] => One of my favorite things about living in Panama is the constant supply of amazing fresh fruit. With Panama’s changing, but ever-warm seasons, there’s always something newly-ripe and ready to eat.
    
    Some options (like the mystery fruit below) might look a little daunting at first sight, but I’ve yet to find a fruit in Panama that wouldn’t make me go back to the tree for seconds.
    
    Panamanian fruit
    
    I fortuitously arrived in Panama at the height of mango season, which may have been the biggest contributing factor to me falling so quickly in love with Panama. During my first visit to the island, I literally got hit over the head with an enormous green mango that dropped from a tree, ready to eat.
    
    I was in heaven.
    
    I also learned quickly that any more than 3 mangoes consumed in one sitting can cause a bit of a stomachache. Stick to 2.
    
    During my time here I have also had the opportunity to try papaya, melons of every variety, maracuyá (passionfruit), guava, guanábana, and a few others simply handed to me by locals that I may never know the name of.
    
    I’ve also sampled cacao straight from the pod, plantains, yucca, and limes and lemons from our organic orchard on Palenque. I feel like every trip there’s a new and exciting locally-grown delicacy to try.
    
    If you’re thinking about a visit to Isla Palenque soon, you can sample pineapple, mamón chino, and the ever-abundant fresh coconut just like our Open House guests did!
    
    Panamanian fruit
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Some options (like the mystery fruit below) might look a little daunting at first sight, but I’ve yet to find a fruit in Panama that wouldn’t make me go back to the tree for seconds.

Panamanian fruit

I fortuitously arrived in Panama at the height of mango season, which may have been the biggest contributing factor to me falling so quickly in love with Panama. During my first visit to the island, I literally got hit over the head with an enormous green mango that dropped from a tree, ready to eat.

I was in heaven.

I also learned quickly that any more than 3 mangoes consumed in one sitting can cause a bit of a stomachache. Stick to 2.

During my time here I have also had the opportunity to try papaya, melons of every variety, maracuyá (passionfruit), guava, guanábana, and a few others simply handed to me by locals that I may never know the name of.

I’ve also sampled cacao straight from the pod, plantains, yucca, and limes and lemons from our organic orchard on Palenque. I feel like every trip there’s a new and exciting locally-grown delicacy to try.

If you’re thinking about a visit to Isla Palenque soon, you can sample pineapple, mamón chino, and the ever-abundant fresh coconut just like our Open House guests did!

Panamanian fruit
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