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  • The Panama-Costa Rica Border: Border Crossing Basics

    Visiting a border crossing station can be intimidating. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when confronted with immigration formalities, customs officers, other travelers, the uncertainty of whether you’re following protocol, border closings, or maybe even a scam. In less developed countries, you may be told you’re “good to go” by the officials on one side, only to discover that you’ve incurred a “fine” (i.e. a bribe is required) on the other.

    Luckily, when crossing the Panama-Costa Rica border, you’ve got nothing to worry about as long as you know what to expect. To better prepare you for your border crossing experience, we’ve consulted travel guides, read top travel blogs, and filled in the blanks with the help of expert expats and members of the travel community.

    What You’ll Need

    If you’re planning to cross the Panama-Costa Rica border, make sure you’ve got your passport, a tourist card ($5), a return bus ticket or proper documentation for using your own vehicle, and proof of economic solvency. In fulfilling this last requirement, Vicki Lansen, a US expatriate and traveler in Central and Latin America, advocates the use of credit cards rather than cash. While there is no fee to enter either country, you’ll need to get your visa stamped with Panama’s exit visa to cross into Costa Rica. Officials on both the Costa Rican and Panamanian sides will examine your passport closely to ensure that you haven’t overstayed your visit.

    Bringing a car over the border involves some additional preparation. Miriam Butterman, author of Moon’s Living Abroad in Panama, recalls a road trip to Costa Rica: “I drove over the border from the Panamanian side using my own car. There was a lot of paperwork involved,” she admits. “I had to fill out several forms before I was allowed to cross the border. I also had to meet with a customs officer [prior to my trip]. It took [the customs officers] about a week [to process my paperwork]. Filling out all the paperwork was time consuming. But all in all, the process was pretty straightforward, and everything went smoothly enough.”

    The requirements for border-crossing are clearly defined, but the actual enforcement may vary depending on the time, day, the official, and that individual’s own caprice. It’s always best to be prepared in case you meet Captain Vigilance on a moody Monday.

    How to Travel

    You can either cross the border by bus or use your own car, but unfortunately it’s illegal to drive a rental car over the Panama-Costa Rica border. And you can’t leave a vehicle behind in Panama without first obtaining the proper documentation for it. This involves getting a stamp on your passport to prove that you’ve paid the importation taxes.

    If you’re planning to drive your own vehicle over the border, copycat Butterman and take care of the paperwork beforehand to ensure a hassle-free transit. Be ready with your vehicle registration, proof of ownership, and driver’s license or International Driving Permit. Also, make sure your vehicle has valid license plates. Butterman adds, “I had to have my car inspected – I sent it in to a professional to take a look at the motor.” Inspections are not a requirement, but a certificate of recent inspection can help you cruise through your border crossing without a hitch. Make sure your car has working headlights, taillights, and blinkers, a spare tire, gas can, flares, fire extinguisher, and a toolbox with replacement parts that are hard to find in Central America (ex: belts). All good things to have handy, even if you’re not doing any border-crossing.

    If you don’t wish to drive, public transportation is a popular and convenient option, whether you’re visiting Panama from Costa Rica or vice versa. Butterman reassures: “Panama’s buses are safe and inexpensive, and they’re easy to use.”

    Where to Cross

    Three crossing stations serve to accommodate Panama-Costa Rica travelers:

    Paso Canoas on the Pacific side

    One of the busiest border crossings in Central America, and potentially the most confusing – you can easily drive over the border without realizing it (not scary, just illegal). On the Costa Rica side, you’ll find a bustling town full of shops and restaurants, whereas the Panama side is little more than a few border crossing offices that look much the same as the other buildings nearby. Non-Spanish speaking travelers crossing at Paso Canoas might benefit from the aid of a tramitator (helper). With proper preparations, the entire process should only take about 45 minutes.

    Rio Sereno on the Pacific side

    In contrast to Paso Canoas, this border crossing station is low on traffic and high on diligence. Lansen describes Rio Sereno as “the best, cleanest, and friendliest crossing of the three.” If your gadgets are low on juice, rest a moment in the gazebo in Rio Sereno’s central park, where you’ll find free wi-fi and electrical outlets, although you may have to compete with schoolchildren to for a chance to plug in.

    You won’t need your tourist card when crossing at Rio Sereno. You will, however, need to provide a copy of your passport’s face page – not a law, but you won’t get very far by refusing to comply. Officials with little better to do than conduct thorough vehicle and baggage inspections may come off as overzealous; failure to present proof of insurance on a privately-owned vehicle could result in an unplanned trip to Paso Canoas. However, if your documents are in order, you should enjoy a swift 30-minute crossing at Rio Sereno.

    Sixaola/Guabito on the Atlantic (Caribbean) side

    You’ll find this off-the-beaten-path option to be fairly relaxed and straightforward. At Sixaola/Guabito, adventure travelers get the added bonus of walking over wooden planks of the former railroad bridge that takes you between Panama and Costa Rica.

    Sixaola Border Crossing

    Photo by Wha'ppen on Flickr

    When to Go

    Paso Canoas is open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. (Costa Rica side) or 11 p.m. (Panama side) every day. For a busy border crossing station like this one, it is recommended you time your arrival for noon or later – early morning border crossings take longer due to commercial truck traffic. Rio Sereno and Sixaola/Guabito border crossing stations are open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lunchtime closings at Rio Sereno (noon to 1 p.m. Panama time) give you an opportunity to pick up a few necessary items, do some shopping, or grab a bite yourself at an open-air restaurant on the Panama side of this border crossing station.

    This insider info should help you have a safe, straightforward, and simple border crossing. Still have questions? Leave us a comment! Or feel free to share your own border crossing experiences!

    More on Miriam Butterman
    Miriam Butterman is a teacher, freelance writer, and the author of Moon’s Living Abroad in Panama. Butterman initially traveled to Panama City in 2000 for a two-year teaching position, but she soon fell in love with the slow pace and lush surroundings. Once her teaching contract ended, Butterman decided to remain in Panama on her own terms, establishing residency and continuing to live and write in Panama City until her return to New York City last year.
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    14 Responses

    1. Barrett Gervan says:

      Can anyone comment on the rules for walking across the border? My parents are staying in Panama for 4 months. I will be in Costa Rica over Christmas half an hour south of Jaco.

      We are wondering if they can make it to the border, can they walk across and rent a vehicle on the Costa Rican side?

      Or is their best bet to find a shuttle from David, Pan for example that can take them to our place South of Jaco.. I think its called Playa Estrillos.

    2. Rebecca says:

      Does anyone know if the boarders are open during holidays? We are planning on going to Costa Rica and Panama during easter next year. The plan so far is that we are going to cross the boarder on the Thursday before good friday (that is if the buses are running that day, still have to find that out). I know that a lot of places close down in the afternoon on that day and some aren’t open at all. Dose anyone have any experience with that?

    3. sarah says:

      i need to have my passport stamped to enable me to drive for a further 3 months in panama. is it legal to get a stamp to leave panama enter costa rica and return to panama for entry stamp minutes later…. or will they need a bribe.. my lawyer is telling me she knows people do it but i dont want to break the law prior to getting a permenant visa. If the police see a stamp entry and exit for the same date is there a problem? my 180 day tourist visa is 180 days but i can only drive for 90..

    4. Benjamin Loomis says:

      Heather, I haven’t heard this, but I do know a lot of people who simply go to Paso Canoas, enter Costa Rica and then turn around and go back to Panama. As I understand it the process takes just a few hours, and then you can stay for 180 days (at least for US citizens). It might sound like a pain, but probably no worse than dealing with attorneys and bureacracy associated with extended a visa…

    5. heather h says:

      Good afternoon, we need to renew our Visa and have heard they’re only giving 30-day extensions. Do you know if anyone else has had this experience? We really need 90 days to complete a volunteer assignment. Thanks!

    6. Beth says:

      Has anyone crossed recently at Río Sereno? We need to have our US passport stamped to keep driving legally here in CR as we don’t have our cedulas yet. We do have our combrabante number for pensionado residency so only need to leave for driving licenses. The plan is to drive our car to P and back to CR so will be getting the paperwork that gives us permission to do that. I have read of issues lately with crossing so want to be sure it will go smoothly.

    7. Rachel says:

      Bev, 72 hours. You’ll find lots of legal requirements listed here http://www.panama-offshore-services.com/tourist_visa.htm — don’t let it intimidate you! Please let us know if you have any other questions about becoming Panama residents. And welcome! :)

    8. Beverly says:

      Hello My husband and I are needing to cross the border for our passport to
      be stamped. What is the legal requirement for the length of stay out of Costa Rica?
      Some people have said they shop for several hours and then return. We will be
      applying for our residency so we don’t want to mess up anything with our
      residency application.
      Thank you
      Bev

    9. Jacki Gillcash says:

      Ifatyowa: Is your debit card from a Panamanian bank? If so, that should be fine. If not, you could have problems. Everyone I know shows a credit card. If you don’t have a Panamanian bank account, maybe try printing off a couple of your bank statements from home? Also, don’t worry about bribes. It won’t happen. For a step-by-step account of how it all goes down, check out my hubby’s blog entry about his border crossing trip. Scroll down until you see “The Border Run”:

      http://ourlifeinpanama.webs.com/news

    10. Rachel Kowalczyk says:

      Ifatyowa — I don’t think you need to worry about being asked for a bribe. That is something that occurs at plenty of other border crossings around the world, but I’ve not heard of anyone going from Panama to Costa Rica having to deal with this. You will, however, need to demonstrate your “proof of economic solvency.” Credit cards are best, but if debit is all you’ve got, you probably want to have sufficient cash (the general recommendation is $500) on hand. Have all your documents on hand, and purchase your return bus ticket ahead of time. And be friendly! It is surprising how helpful smiling can be to make the process less of a worry for everybody involved. Don’t hesitate to leave us another comment if you still have questions, and good luck!

    11. Ifatyowa Cabeza says:

      I am planning to cross from Panama to CR and back. Proof of solvency? I do not have a credit card, I only have debit cards and will I need to get a return bus ticket to Costa Rica? Not clear on that.

      Will I know if I am being asked for a bribe? Should I pay the bribe?

    12. manfred says:

      during the multiple goings from panama to cosra rica at the crossing paseo canoas, with or without my car in the time from 2002 until 2011 i have never expirient any obsticles. the crossing takes not more then 1 hour as a person and not more then 2 hours taken the car.if you come prepaired with your documents and tripple copys of such no delays hapened.going in to panama you will get a turist card[$5.-us[balboa]all documents are valid fore 90 days and can be rennewed after leaving the contry for at least 72hours[if you not taking your car out within the 90 day-the car will be seiced as a canadin i was allways assisted in a friendly way[documents/ valid passport/car-original regisration[ in your name] of your contry with more then 90 days of registration,valid driverlicence with picture on it/newly you are ask to buy panamenian liabilty inshurance for the time of visit[$12to$20 [balboas][maid be depending on the type of car you drive] i hope this will take out the fear of crossin[be aware the any overstayed time is subject to a fine-no exeption]

    13. Rachel Kowalczyk says:

      Vicki – thank you for your excellent input. I’ll be incorporating it into the article ASAP. Since things have obviously changed since our source last made a border crossing, your info is very helpful. I like how you put it, diplomatically: “the implementation by border officials is sometimes sketchy, or firm, depending on the official, the day, and the mood.” What do you think these type of inconsistencies reflect? Panama is definitely in a state of transition, an up-and-comer… perhaps the varying levels of vigilance are related to this country’s growth/growing pains?

    14. Vicki says:

      I wonder when the last time Miriam has physically made these border crossings? While in general the information is not incorrect, it is not complete. It is important to know that while the requirements are clear, the implementation by border officials is sometimes sketchy, or firm, depending on the official, the day, and the mood.

      For Rio Serano, you are required when entering or leaving Panama, to provide a copy of your passport face page (not an actual law, but required there for some reason). Upon entering Panama at this crossing, they often require you to show a return bus or plane ticket outward bound from Panama. You may also be asked to show proof of financial solvency. Any credit card will do and is preferable to flashing cash, though Rio Serano is above all, the best, cleanest and friendliest crossing of the three. There is no tourist card requirement.

      On the Panama side, the Aduanas close their office for lunch from 12 noon until 1:00 pm Panama time. If you arrive during that time, you can check out of Costa Rica, walk to the Panama side and have a bite to eat at a little open-air restaurant while waiting, or shop in the grocery store for necessities. If you are coming by bus, it is a several block walk down the main street to the bus station where you can catch buses to Volcan, and onward to destinations such as Cerro Punta/Guadalupe (gateways to La Amistad) or to Bugaba on the Inter-American Highway onward to David.

      At certain times, depending on the availability of personell, private vehicles are not allowed to cross, causing you to have to drive all the way down to the Pasa Canoa crossing. They are sticklers for documentation on vehicles (including proper insurance) at this crossing.

      At this crossing, we have never, nor has anyone we know, been required to have a $5 tourist card. The immigration officials on both sides will be looking at your passport closely to make sure it is in order and you have not overstayed your visit. There are no fees on the Costa Rican, or Panamanian side.

      Interesting note: In Rio Serano, the central park has free wi-fi. You can even charge your cell phone or computer in the park gazebo if it isn’t overrun with school kids using the plugs.

  • stdClass Object
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        [ID] => 13238
        [post_author] => 46
        [post_date] => 2011-12-02 09:00:04
        [post_date_gmt] => 2011-12-02 15:00:04
        [post_content] => Visiting a border crossing station can be intimidating. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when confronted with immigration formalities, customs officers, other travelers, the uncertainty of whether you’re following protocol, border closings, or maybe even a scam. In less developed countries, you may be told you’re “good to go” by the officials on one side, only to discover that you’ve incurred a “fine” (i.e. a bribe is required) on the other.
    
    Luckily, when crossing the Panama-Costa Rica border, you’ve got nothing to worry about as long as you know what to expect. To better prepare you for your border crossing experience, we’ve consulted travel guides, read top travel blogs, and filled in the blanks with the help of expert expats and members of the travel community.
    
    What You’ll Need
    
    If you're planning to cross the Panama-Costa Rica border, make sure you've got your passport, a tourist card ($5), a return bus ticket or proper documentation for using your own vehicle, and proof of economic solvency. In fulfilling this last requirement, Vicki Lansen, a US expatriate and traveler in Central and Latin America, advocates the use of credit cards rather than cash. While there is no fee to enter either country, you’ll need to get your visa stamped with Panama’s exit visa to cross into Costa Rica. Officials on both the Costa Rican and Panamanian sides will examine your passport closely to ensure that you haven't overstayed your visit.
    
    Bringing a car over the border involves some additional preparation. Miriam Butterman, author of Moon’s Living Abroad in Panama, recalls a road trip to Costa Rica: “I drove over the border from the Panamanian side using my own car. There was a lot of paperwork involved,” she admits. “I had to fill out several forms before I was allowed to cross the border. I also had to meet with a customs officer [prior to my trip]. It took [the customs officers] about a week [to process my paperwork]. Filling out all the paperwork was time consuming. But all in all, the process was pretty straightforward, and everything went smoothly enough.”
    
    The requirements for border-crossing are clearly defined, but the actual enforcement may vary depending on the time, day, the official, and that individual's own caprice. It's always best to be prepared in case you meet Captain Vigilance on a moody Monday.
    
    How to Travel
    
    You can either cross the border by bus or use your own car, but unfortunately it’s illegal to drive a rental car over the Panama-Costa Rica border. And you can’t leave a vehicle behind in Panama without first obtaining the proper documentation for it. This involves getting a stamp on your passport to prove that you’ve paid the importation taxes.
    
    If you’re planning to drive your own vehicle over the border, copycat Butterman and take care of the paperwork beforehand to ensure a hassle-free transit. Be ready with your vehicle registration, proof of ownership, and driver’s license or International Driving Permit. Also, make sure your vehicle has valid license plates. Butterman adds, “I had to have my car inspected - I sent it in to a professional to take a look at the motor.” Inspections are not a requirement, but a certificate of recent inspection can help you cruise through your border crossing without a hitch. Make sure your car has working headlights, taillights, and blinkers, a spare tire, gas can, flares, fire extinguisher, and a toolbox with replacement parts that are hard to find in Central America (ex: belts). All good things to have handy, even if you’re not doing any border-crossing.
    
    If you don’t wish to drive, public transportation is a popular and convenient option, whether you’re visiting Panama from Costa Rica or vice versa. Butterman reassures: “Panama’s buses are safe and inexpensive, and they’re easy to use.”
    
    Where to Cross
    
    Three crossing stations serve to accommodate Panama-Costa Rica travelers:
    
    Paso Canoas on the Pacific side
    
    One of the busiest border crossings in Central America, and potentially the most confusing - you can easily drive over the border without realizing it (not scary, just illegal). On the Costa Rica side, you’ll find a bustling town full of shops and restaurants, whereas the Panama side is little more than a few border crossing offices that look much the same as the other buildings nearby. Non-Spanish speaking travelers crossing at Paso Canoas might benefit from the aid of a tramitator (helper). With proper preparations, the entire process should only take about 45 minutes.
    Rio Sereno on the Pacific side
    In contrast to Paso Canoas, this border crossing station is low on traffic and high on diligence. Lansen describes Rio Sereno as "the best, cleanest, and friendliest crossing of the three." If your gadgets are low on juice, rest a moment in the gazebo in Rio Sereno's central park, where you'll find free wi-fi and electrical outlets, although you may have to compete with schoolchildren to for a chance to plug in. You won't need your tourist card when crossing at Rio Sereno. You will, however, need to provide a copy of your passport's face page - not a law, but you won't get very far by refusing to comply. Officials with little better to do than conduct thorough vehicle and baggage inspections may come off as overzealous; failure to present proof of insurance on a privately-owned vehicle could result in an unplanned trip to Paso Canoas. However, if your documents are in order, you should enjoy a swift 30-minute crossing at Rio Sereno.
    Sixaola/Guabito on the Atlantic (Caribbean) side
    You’ll find this off-the-beaten-path option to be fairly relaxed and straightforward. At Sixaola/Guabito, adventure travelers get the added bonus of walking over wooden planks of the former railroad bridge that takes you between Panama and Costa Rica.
    [caption id="attachment_13239" align="aligncenter" width="600" caption="Photo by Wha'ppen on Flickr"]Sixaola Border Crossing[/caption] When to Go Paso Canoas is open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. (Costa Rica side) or 11 p.m. (Panama side) every day. For a busy border crossing station like this one, it is recommended you time your arrival for noon or later – early morning border crossings take longer due to commercial truck traffic. Rio Sereno and Sixaola/Guabito border crossing stations are open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lunchtime closings at Rio Sereno (noon to 1 p.m. Panama time) give you an opportunity to pick up a few necessary items, do some shopping, or grab a bite yourself at an open-air restaurant on the Panama side of this border crossing station. This insider info should help you have a safe, straightforward, and simple border crossing. Still have questions? Leave us a comment! Or feel free to share your own border crossing experiences!
    More on Miriam Butterman
    Miriam Butterman is a teacher, freelance writer, and the author of Moon’s Living Abroad in Panama. Butterman initially traveled to Panama City in 2000 for a two-year teaching position, but she soon fell in love with the slow pace and lush surroundings. Once her teaching contract ended, Butterman decided to remain in Panama on her own terms, establishing residency and continuing to live and write in Panama City until her return to New York City last year.
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    [post_content] => Visiting a border crossing station can be intimidating. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when confronted with immigration formalities, customs officers, other travelers, the uncertainty of whether you’re following protocol, border closings, or maybe even a scam. In less developed countries, you may be told you’re “good to go” by the officials on one side, only to discover that you’ve incurred a “fine” (i.e. a bribe is required) on the other.

Luckily, when crossing the Panama-Costa Rica border, you’ve got nothing to worry about as long as you know what to expect. To better prepare you for your border crossing experience, we’ve consulted travel guides, read top travel blogs, and filled in the blanks with the help of expert expats and members of the travel community.

What You’ll Need

If you're planning to cross the Panama-Costa Rica border, make sure you've got your passport, a tourist card ($5), a return bus ticket or proper documentation for using your own vehicle, and proof of economic solvency. In fulfilling this last requirement, Vicki Lansen, a US expatriate and traveler in Central and Latin America, advocates the use of credit cards rather than cash. While there is no fee to enter either country, you’ll need to get your visa stamped with Panama’s exit visa to cross into Costa Rica. Officials on both the Costa Rican and Panamanian sides will examine your passport closely to ensure that you haven't overstayed your visit.

Bringing a car over the border involves some additional preparation. Miriam Butterman, author of Moon’s Living Abroad in Panama, recalls a road trip to Costa Rica: “I drove over the border from the Panamanian side using my own car. There was a lot of paperwork involved,” she admits. “I had to fill out several forms before I was allowed to cross the border. I also had to meet with a customs officer [prior to my trip]. It took [the customs officers] about a week [to process my paperwork]. Filling out all the paperwork was time consuming. But all in all, the process was pretty straightforward, and everything went smoothly enough.”

The requirements for border-crossing are clearly defined, but the actual enforcement may vary depending on the time, day, the official, and that individual's own caprice. It's always best to be prepared in case you meet Captain Vigilance on a moody Monday.

How to Travel

You can either cross the border by bus or use your own car, but unfortunately it’s illegal to drive a rental car over the Panama-Costa Rica border. And you can’t leave a vehicle behind in Panama without first obtaining the proper documentation for it. This involves getting a stamp on your passport to prove that you’ve paid the importation taxes.

If you’re planning to drive your own vehicle over the border, copycat Butterman and take care of the paperwork beforehand to ensure a hassle-free transit. Be ready with your vehicle registration, proof of ownership, and driver’s license or International Driving Permit. Also, make sure your vehicle has valid license plates. Butterman adds, “I had to have my car inspected - I sent it in to a professional to take a look at the motor.” Inspections are not a requirement, but a certificate of recent inspection can help you cruise through your border crossing without a hitch. Make sure your car has working headlights, taillights, and blinkers, a spare tire, gas can, flares, fire extinguisher, and a toolbox with replacement parts that are hard to find in Central America (ex: belts). All good things to have handy, even if you’re not doing any border-crossing.

If you don’t wish to drive, public transportation is a popular and convenient option, whether you’re visiting Panama from Costa Rica or vice versa. Butterman reassures: “Panama’s buses are safe and inexpensive, and they’re easy to use.”

Where to Cross

Three crossing stations serve to accommodate Panama-Costa Rica travelers:

Paso Canoas on the Pacific side
One of the busiest border crossings in Central America, and potentially the most confusing - you can easily drive over the border without realizing it (not scary, just illegal). On the Costa Rica side, you’ll find a bustling town full of shops and restaurants, whereas the Panama side is little more than a few border crossing offices that look much the same as the other buildings nearby. Non-Spanish speaking travelers crossing at Paso Canoas might benefit from the aid of a tramitator (helper). With proper preparations, the entire process should only take about 45 minutes.
Rio Sereno on the Pacific side
In contrast to Paso Canoas, this border crossing station is low on traffic and high on diligence. Lansen describes Rio Sereno as "the best, cleanest, and friendliest crossing of the three." If your gadgets are low on juice, rest a moment in the gazebo in Rio Sereno's central park, where you'll find free wi-fi and electrical outlets, although you may have to compete with schoolchildren to for a chance to plug in. You won't need your tourist card when crossing at Rio Sereno. You will, however, need to provide a copy of your passport's face page - not a law, but you won't get very far by refusing to comply. Officials with little better to do than conduct thorough vehicle and baggage inspections may come off as overzealous; failure to present proof of insurance on a privately-owned vehicle could result in an unplanned trip to Paso Canoas. However, if your documents are in order, you should enjoy a swift 30-minute crossing at Rio Sereno.
Sixaola/Guabito on the Atlantic (Caribbean) side
You’ll find this off-the-beaten-path option to be fairly relaxed and straightforward. At Sixaola/Guabito, adventure travelers get the added bonus of walking over wooden planks of the former railroad bridge that takes you between Panama and Costa Rica.
[caption id="attachment_13239" align="aligncenter" width="600" caption="Photo by Wha'ppen on Flickr"]Sixaola Border Crossing[/caption] When to Go Paso Canoas is open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. (Costa Rica side) or 11 p.m. (Panama side) every day. For a busy border crossing station like this one, it is recommended you time your arrival for noon or later – early morning border crossings take longer due to commercial truck traffic. Rio Sereno and Sixaola/Guabito border crossing stations are open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lunchtime closings at Rio Sereno (noon to 1 p.m. Panama time) give you an opportunity to pick up a few necessary items, do some shopping, or grab a bite yourself at an open-air restaurant on the Panama side of this border crossing station. This insider info should help you have a safe, straightforward, and simple border crossing. Still have questions? Leave us a comment! Or feel free to share your own border crossing experiences!
More on Miriam Butterman
Miriam Butterman is a teacher, freelance writer, and the author of Moon’s Living Abroad in Panama. Butterman initially traveled to Panama City in 2000 for a two-year teaching position, but she soon fell in love with the slow pace and lush surroundings. Once her teaching contract ended, Butterman decided to remain in Panama on her own terms, establishing residency and continuing to live and write in Panama City until her return to New York City last year.
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