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  • Social Media for Travel Professionals: Miscreants & Models

    Travel blogger, Kyle Ellison

    Almost from the moment The Resort at Isla Palenque started to move from fantasy to reality, we have been online, talking about it. Originally entitled “Voices of Eco-Development,” the Isla Palenque blog was born mere weeks after plans began for Amble’s premiere eco-resort.

    From a marketing standpoint, this might have been a tad premature. But it seemed obvious to share all we were learning and loving about the process of bringing a dream to life on an undiscovered island in Panama. If you can keep quiet about something like that, then hats off to you.

    Over the past two years, we’ve witnessed the rise and fall of several networking sites, realizing along the way that we don’t always have to jump on the bandwagon or ride the fluctuating trends if they’re not the greatest fit for our message.

    The time has come at last – to scare the birds off Twitter’s rooftops with our shouts of excitement, to share our exhilarated status with the Facebook world, and to pin our hopes of welcoming discerning travelers all over Pinterest – we are preparing for the much-anticipated opening of The Resort at Isla Palenque later this year!

    With this imminent event on the horizon, it now feels quite natural to fully participate in the online travel community. So we’ve jumped in, and for the most part, things have been going swimmingly. But as we take notes from the seasoned experts, there are a few things that trouble us about the way certain travel writers are using social media.

    Travel Writers Who Misuse Social Media

    A disclaimer, before I launch into this diatribe: I understand that Facebook and Twitter are instrumental to finding and maintaining an audience in the digital age. And I also recognize that, to a degree, “putting yourself out there” is required for career-building in any industry, perhaps more so in the travel industry.

    For starters, social media can be addictive. These outlets can distract from the writing, as well as from genuine immersion in place, both of which will ultimately undermine quality travel journalism. Imagine a travel writer visiting Rome, spending chunks of precious time in the hotel room on a laptop or busy on a smartphone instead of engaging with the colorful characters in the Piazza Navona. That’s not an account of Rome I wish to read.

    Worse still? When travel writers use social networking sites more in an effort to open doors for themselves and less to open a window onto the world for others. By this, I mean a travel blogger who uses Facebook and Twitter to pursue free hotel stays and comped meals rather than to host conversations with their readers and fans.

    “As a travel writer, the focus should always be on the passion for travel and experiencing new places, not the perks that may arise on the side,” says Kyle Ellison, travel blogger and creator of kylethevagabond.com.

    A reevaluation of priorities may be in order for the travel blogger who puts self-promotion ahead of connecting with their audience. Losing touch with the online travel community is a fast track to losing your following, and some of the most popular travel writers would do well to note this.

    We were surprised by some of the ways individuals rejected our invitation to join the Island Intern Contest Panel of Experts. It was disheartening that our request for help in guiding a group of ambitious hopeful travelers was met with demands for some serious compensation from several of the travel bloggers we contacted. What happened to the idea of an online community centered on a particular passion? Coming from the resort developer, this may seem a surprise, but when we log into a social network, we don’t expect to find that it’s really an online marketplace.

    Travel blogger, bad habits

    Some of these people who have their priorities in the wrong place are setting themselves up for a rude awakening – and with how quickly things move these days, it could come as soon as tomorrow. Longtime industry leaders still prize journalistic integrity, and for good reason: an opinion that has not been purchased has value; purchased opinions do not.

    A travel writer’s primary responsibility is to satisfy the demand for original content that inspires its readers to travel or to see their travels in a meaningful way. The coveted occupations of self-styled travel experts wouldn’t exist in the first place without an enthusiastic audience seeking “the inside scoop” on destinations around the world. It becomes difficult for any travel writer to meet this demand when they allow social media use (or misuse) to get them sidetracked.

    And 11 People Who Don’t

    On a more positive note, I’ve relished the opportunity over the past couple of weeks to feature a group of travel professionals successfully avoiding these pitfalls: our Island Intern Contest Panel of Experts. Each of these standout individuals provides a positive example to our Island Intern hopefuls on how to have meaningful conversations about travel via social media without allowing it to compromise their creative output. These 11 experts will weigh in on candidates to inform the selection of this year’s Isla Palenque Island Intern, providing a free lesson in the art of navigating the globe and the social media landscape to aspiring travel journalists.

    The panel includes inspiring adventurers Leon Logothetis and Kyle the Vagabond, womens’ travel pioneer Evelyn Hannon, award-winning journalists Andrew McCarthy and Boyd Matson, wildlife cinematographer Andy B. Casagrande, travel editors Kim Mance, Eva Holland, and Jen Leo, and Jetsetter’s social media guru Jon Goldmann. The final panel expert is Benjamin Loomis, founder and president of Amble Resorts.

    These leaders have demonstrated their knack for survival in an increasingly competitive industry. It comes as no surprise that such seasoned travelers were able to quickly find their way around the Tweetdeck and the Timeline, seamlessly incorporating new media channels into their efforts to promote meaningful travel. As some of the busiest people in travel today, they had every excuse to turn down Amble Resorts’ invitation to join the Panel of Experts for the 2012 Island Intern Contest. But their unhesitating acceptance truly touched our team here at Amble Resorts.

    “In an age where digital response rules, human connection still makes a big difference,” said Emily Kinskey, Amble Resorts’ Marketing Manager.

    This outstanding group will evaluate Island Intern hopefuls to help us with the challenge of choosing an intern who embodies a combination of global awareness and cultural sensitivity, social media savvy, and a good old-fashioned adventurous spirit. Even as tech-savvy Millennials constantly rewrite the rules and invent new job descriptions for old occupations, it’s encouraging to see travel industry leaders embracing the new without discarding the core concepts of good travel journalism – truly connecting with people and lending a helping hand to inspire the next generation of advocates.

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    Post by Rachel Kowalczyk

    Rachel is transported around the world every day through the storytelling of a group of travel writers she feels privileged to work with as Managing Editor for The Ambler. Meet Rachel >>

    More posts by Rachel Kowalczyk

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    8 Responses

    1. Rachel Rachel Kowalczyk says:

      Sandy, just to be clear — my role in this was all the fun part. I got to write about 11 outstanding people. Not hard to do.

      My colleagues at Amble Resorts (Katherine and Emily) did the dirty work. They scoured the travel community, made careful choices as to who they would reach out to about becoming an expert judge… then waited for a response… then received some email replies that were “disappointing” if we’re going to be tactfully euphemistic about it.

    2. Sassy says:

      I couldn’t put my finger on why the $20 endorsement continued to annoy me as much as it did. Then it hit me. On a daily basis, I probably get used by people because I regularly e-mail or talk to small local groups of parents of special need kids about different advocacy topics. (When you’ve been on the road for a while, those new to the marathon need so much support). There are people who would call themselves *consultants* and charge for such information. I just cannot do that. Money just isn’t that important to me. Furthermore, I wouldn’t be able to look myself in the mirror and respect myself. However, if it was my only means of supporting myself and my child, I would have no choice but to reconsider.

      I think it’s truly wonderful to see that Rachel found 11 people who, despite being very accomplished and busy themselves, also had the generosity of heart to give back to the profession they love. That is a priceless gift, and it’s nice to see each one of these people profiled. I have enjoyed reading their bios and plan to delve further into their work. Thank you for opening my mind to new and exciting avenues.

    3. Kristen says:

      There is no doubt that I would love to make a living off of Travel Blogging/Vlogging but who wouldn’t want to make a living off what they love to do most. I just believe that when you are making a living and very successful in doing what you are most passionate about, it’s important to remember that you are doing it because you love it and you are just lucky enough to be able to make a career of it. I really enjoyed this piece of yours and think it is very important for people in the travel community to read.

    4. Rachel Rachel Kowalczyk says:

      Kristen — your pure passion is touching, and I would hope that others who are travel blogging for fun (and not as their livelihood) would help out in instances like judging our Island Intern Contest without demanding compensation. Matt pointed out the unavoidable issues of time & money where they occur in the real scheme of things for a travel professional who earns their living by travel blogging. It’s important to keep both the ideal and the practical reality in mind. My main purpose in writing this piece was to shine a spotlight on the 11 individuals who, in addition to being successful travel media experts, remain true to the kind of pure, selfless passion of people like you who do it out of love.

    5. Kristen says:

      The reason I became a travel blogger is because I want to inspire people all around the world. Technology and social media is brilliant in the sense that you can reach out to people all around the globe. I try to use social media solely as a way to share, inspire and learn from it without spending endless hours in front of the computer. I think that is really important. I do that by going out and exploring this world, and using my experiences to inspire others to do the same.

      If I was blogging because I want to make money or reep the benefits of a free trip, then I would have never started blogging to begin with. I’ve been travel blogging seriously for 2 years now, and have barely made a penny from it. I do it because I love travel and I love connected with people and sharing my experiences and adventures with like-minded people. The best feeling is receiving an email from a reader who has been so inspired by my writing and videos, that they have decided to take off and travel the world themselves. It’s the best feeling when someone emails me with questions and concerns about traveling since they have never done it before, but my world travels have inspired them to want to get out there and try it for themselves. I love when someone emails me after returning from a trip telling me that I inspired them to take off and it was the best decision they have ever made. I love being part of that journey with people. It’s so, so rewarding and the whole point of why I do what I do. It’s actually saddens me to read that people were demanding money to be part of the Island Intern Judging Pannel. This entire mission is amazing and for people who love the world of travel, being part of changing lives, truly connecting with people and nature and lending a helping hand to inspire the next generation of advocates just as you mentioned. You’d think that the people people who are in the travel blogging community would jump on board without hesitation or receiving anything but the fact that their input is inspiring and helping others achieve their dreams.

    6. Sassy says:

      I have to admit, this was a fascinating (and extremely well written) article. Personally, I am probably too naive for my own good, so I will weigh the opinions of your recommended bloggers very heavily. Aside: I already weighed Andrew McCarthy’s opinion highly.

      In many ways, I get sad reading about such antics (the $20 PayPal request) because I hope that people advise with good intentions. So, thank you for pointing out this trend, as it will help me better discern in the future.

    7. Rachel Rachel Kowalczyk says:

      Matthew — thank you for adding your voice to the discussion. As a travel professional on the other side of this issue, you are key to this conversation. I understand that you don’t have time to investigate every offer that comes your way, so it sounds like asking about rates or mentioning compensation is actually a pretty good method of weeding out the ones looking to exploit you for free publicity.

      But maybe this discussion is illuminating some of the miscommunications that occur in these situations; hopefully this can help us come up with a more tactful way for travel writers to sort out the requests & offers they receive, take advantage of the good ones, and respectfully decline the rest.

      Because rightly or wrongly, we formed a negative opinion about people who responded with rudeness and with unreasonable demands (such as $20 for a Tweet we didn’t even request of them). I’m interested to hear others’ suggestions of respectful ways travel bloggers and other travel professionals to turn down requests such as the ones we sent out asking for help with judging videos in the Island Intern Contest.

    8. While I agree that asking for $20 a tweet is a bit ridiculous, so is the fact that hundreds of for-profit travel companies & resorts are absolutely bombarding travel bloggers with requests like this in the hopes of gaining some free marketing for themselves & their business.

      Sometimes it’s hard to sort through all the crap. One of the quickest ways to sort through the BS is to ask for money for your time. My goal is promote travel that I’m passionate about, not someone else’s hotel. While I don’t mind occasionally promoting a great hotel, I’m not going to do it for free, because my blog is not about promoting hotels. 🙂

      I’m sure I’ve written-off a few companies too quickly myself, because frankly all these offers start to sound like background noise I can’t be bothered with.

      My suggestion is to not take it personally, and move on to work with people who are interested in what you’re offering. Looks like you’ve gathered a good group there. 🙂

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        [post_content] => Travel blogger, Kyle Ellison
    
    Almost from the moment The Resort at Isla Palenque started to move from fantasy to reality, we have been online, talking about it. Originally entitled “Voices of Eco-Development,” the Isla Palenque blog was born mere weeks after plans began for Amble’s premiere eco-resort.
    
    From a marketing standpoint, this might have been a tad premature. But it seemed obvious to share all we were learning and loving about the process of bringing a dream to life on an undiscovered island in Panama. If you can keep quiet about something like that, then hats off to you.
    
    Over the past two years, we’ve witnessed the rise and fall of several networking sites, realizing along the way that we don’t always have to jump on the bandwagon or ride the fluctuating trends if they're not the greatest fit for our message.
    
    The time has come at last – to scare the birds off Twitter’s rooftops with our shouts of excitement, to share our exhilarated status with the Facebook world, and to pin our hopes of welcoming discerning travelers all over Pinterest – we are preparing for the much-anticipated opening of The Resort at Isla Palenque later this year!
    
    With this imminent event on the horizon, it now feels quite natural to fully participate in the online travel community. So we’ve jumped in, and for the most part, things have been going swimmingly. But as we take notes from the seasoned experts, there are a few things that trouble us about the way certain travel writers are using social media.
    
    Travel Writers Who Misuse Social Media
    
    A disclaimer, before I launch into this diatribe: I understand that Facebook and Twitter are instrumental to finding and maintaining an audience in the digital age. And I also recognize that, to a degree, “putting yourself out there” is required for career-building in any industry, perhaps more so in the travel industry.
    For starters, social media can be addictive. These outlets can distract from the writing, as well as from genuine immersion in place, both of which will ultimately undermine quality travel journalism. Imagine a travel writer visiting Rome, spending chunks of precious time in the hotel room on a laptop or busy on a smartphone instead of engaging with the colorful characters in the Piazza Navona. That's not an account of Rome I wish to read. Worse still? When travel writers use social networking sites more in an effort to open doors for themselves and less to open a window onto the world for others. By this, I mean a travel blogger who uses Facebook and Twitter to pursue free hotel stays and comped meals rather than to host conversations with their readers and fans. “As a travel writer, the focus should always be on the passion for travel and experiencing new places, not the perks that may arise on the side,” says Kyle Ellison, travel blogger and creator of kylethevagabond.com. A reevaluation of priorities may be in order for the travel blogger who puts self-promotion ahead of connecting with their audience. Losing touch with the online travel community is a fast track to losing your following, and some of the most popular travel writers would do well to note this. We were surprised by some of the ways individuals rejected our invitation to join the Island Intern Contest Panel of Experts. It was disheartening that our request for help in guiding a group of ambitious hopeful travelers was met with demands for some serious compensation from several of the travel bloggers we contacted. What happened to the idea of an online community centered on a particular passion? Coming from the resort developer, this may seem a surprise, but when we log into a social network, we don't expect to find that it's really an online marketplace. Travel blogger, bad habits Some of these people who have their priorities in the wrong place are setting themselves up for a rude awakening – and with how quickly things move these days, it could come as soon as tomorrow. Longtime industry leaders still prize journalistic integrity, and for good reason: an opinion that has not been purchased has value; purchased opinions do not. A travel writer’s primary responsibility is to satisfy the demand for original content that inspires its readers to travel or to see their travels in a meaningful way. The coveted occupations of self-styled travel experts wouldn’t exist in the first place without an enthusiastic audience seeking “the inside scoop” on destinations around the world. It becomes difficult for any travel writer to meet this demand when they allow social media use (or misuse) to get them sidetracked. And 11 People Who Don't On a more positive note, I've relished the opportunity over the past couple of weeks to feature a group of travel professionals successfully avoiding these pitfalls: our Island Intern Contest Panel of Experts. Each of these standout individuals provides a positive example to our Island Intern hopefuls on how to have meaningful conversations about travel via social media without allowing it to compromise their creative output. These 11 experts will weigh in on candidates to inform the selection of this year’s Isla Palenque Island Intern, providing a free lesson in the art of navigating the globe and the social media landscape to aspiring travel journalists. The panel includes inspiring adventurers Leon Logothetis and Kyle the Vagabond, womens’ travel pioneer Evelyn Hannon, award-winning journalists Andrew McCarthy and Boyd Matson, wildlife cinematographer Andy B. Casagrande, travel editors Kim Mance, Eva Holland, and Jen Leo, and Jetsetter’s social media guru Jon Goldmann. The final panel expert is Benjamin Loomis, founder and president of Amble Resorts. These leaders have demonstrated their knack for survival in an increasingly competitive industry. It comes as no surprise that such seasoned travelers were able to quickly find their way around the Tweetdeck and the Timeline, seamlessly incorporating new media channels into their efforts to promote meaningful travel. As some of the busiest people in travel today, they had every excuse to turn down Amble Resorts’ invitation to join the Panel of Experts for the 2012 Island Intern Contest. But their unhesitating acceptance truly touched our team here at Amble Resorts. “In an age where digital response rules, human connection still makes a big difference,” said Emily Kinskey, Amble Resorts’ Marketing Manager. This outstanding group will evaluate Island Intern hopefuls to help us with the challenge of choosing an intern who embodies a combination of global awareness and cultural sensitivity, social media savvy, and a good old-fashioned adventurous spirit. Even as tech-savvy Millennials constantly rewrite the rules and invent new job descriptions for old occupations, it’s encouraging to see travel industry leaders embracing the new without discarding the core concepts of good travel journalism – truly connecting with people and lending a helping hand to inspire the next generation of advocates. 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Almost from the moment The Resort at Isla Palenque started to move from fantasy to reality, we have been online, talking about it. Originally entitled “Voices of Eco-Development,” the Isla Palenque blog was born mere weeks after plans began for Amble’s premiere eco-resort.

From a marketing standpoint, this might have been a tad premature. But it seemed obvious to share all we were learning and loving about the process of bringing a dream to life on an undiscovered island in Panama. If you can keep quiet about something like that, then hats off to you.

Over the past two years, we’ve witnessed the rise and fall of several networking sites, realizing along the way that we don’t always have to jump on the bandwagon or ride the fluctuating trends if they're not the greatest fit for our message.

The time has come at last – to scare the birds off Twitter’s rooftops with our shouts of excitement, to share our exhilarated status with the Facebook world, and to pin our hopes of welcoming discerning travelers all over Pinterest – we are preparing for the much-anticipated opening of The Resort at Isla Palenque later this year!

With this imminent event on the horizon, it now feels quite natural to fully participate in the online travel community. So we’ve jumped in, and for the most part, things have been going swimmingly. But as we take notes from the seasoned experts, there are a few things that trouble us about the way certain travel writers are using social media.

Travel Writers Who Misuse Social Media
A disclaimer, before I launch into this diatribe: I understand that Facebook and Twitter are instrumental to finding and maintaining an audience in the digital age. And I also recognize that, to a degree, “putting yourself out there” is required for career-building in any industry, perhaps more so in the travel industry.
For starters, social media can be addictive. These outlets can distract from the writing, as well as from genuine immersion in place, both of which will ultimately undermine quality travel journalism. Imagine a travel writer visiting Rome, spending chunks of precious time in the hotel room on a laptop or busy on a smartphone instead of engaging with the colorful characters in the Piazza Navona. That's not an account of Rome I wish to read. Worse still? When travel writers use social networking sites more in an effort to open doors for themselves and less to open a window onto the world for others. By this, I mean a travel blogger who uses Facebook and Twitter to pursue free hotel stays and comped meals rather than to host conversations with their readers and fans. “As a travel writer, the focus should always be on the passion for travel and experiencing new places, not the perks that may arise on the side,” says Kyle Ellison, travel blogger and creator of kylethevagabond.com. A reevaluation of priorities may be in order for the travel blogger who puts self-promotion ahead of connecting with their audience. Losing touch with the online travel community is a fast track to losing your following, and some of the most popular travel writers would do well to note this. We were surprised by some of the ways individuals rejected our invitation to join the Island Intern Contest Panel of Experts. It was disheartening that our request for help in guiding a group of ambitious hopeful travelers was met with demands for some serious compensation from several of the travel bloggers we contacted. What happened to the idea of an online community centered on a particular passion? Coming from the resort developer, this may seem a surprise, but when we log into a social network, we don't expect to find that it's really an online marketplace. Travel blogger, bad habits Some of these people who have their priorities in the wrong place are setting themselves up for a rude awakening – and with how quickly things move these days, it could come as soon as tomorrow. Longtime industry leaders still prize journalistic integrity, and for good reason: an opinion that has not been purchased has value; purchased opinions do not. A travel writer’s primary responsibility is to satisfy the demand for original content that inspires its readers to travel or to see their travels in a meaningful way. The coveted occupations of self-styled travel experts wouldn’t exist in the first place without an enthusiastic audience seeking “the inside scoop” on destinations around the world. It becomes difficult for any travel writer to meet this demand when they allow social media use (or misuse) to get them sidetracked. And 11 People Who Don't On a more positive note, I've relished the opportunity over the past couple of weeks to feature a group of travel professionals successfully avoiding these pitfalls: our Island Intern Contest Panel of Experts. Each of these standout individuals provides a positive example to our Island Intern hopefuls on how to have meaningful conversations about travel via social media without allowing it to compromise their creative output. These 11 experts will weigh in on candidates to inform the selection of this year’s Isla Palenque Island Intern, providing a free lesson in the art of navigating the globe and the social media landscape to aspiring travel journalists. The panel includes inspiring adventurers Leon Logothetis and Kyle the Vagabond, womens’ travel pioneer Evelyn Hannon, award-winning journalists Andrew McCarthy and Boyd Matson, wildlife cinematographer Andy B. Casagrande, travel editors Kim Mance, Eva Holland, and Jen Leo, and Jetsetter’s social media guru Jon Goldmann. The final panel expert is Benjamin Loomis, founder and president of Amble Resorts. These leaders have demonstrated their knack for survival in an increasingly competitive industry. It comes as no surprise that such seasoned travelers were able to quickly find their way around the Tweetdeck and the Timeline, seamlessly incorporating new media channels into their efforts to promote meaningful travel. As some of the busiest people in travel today, they had every excuse to turn down Amble Resorts’ invitation to join the Panel of Experts for the 2012 Island Intern Contest. But their unhesitating acceptance truly touched our team here at Amble Resorts. “In an age where digital response rules, human connection still makes a big difference,” said Emily Kinskey, Amble Resorts’ Marketing Manager. This outstanding group will evaluate Island Intern hopefuls to help us with the challenge of choosing an intern who embodies a combination of global awareness and cultural sensitivity, social media savvy, and a good old-fashioned adventurous spirit. Even as tech-savvy Millennials constantly rewrite the rules and invent new job descriptions for old occupations, it’s encouraging to see travel industry leaders embracing the new without discarding the core concepts of good travel journalism – truly connecting with people and lending a helping hand to inspire the next generation of advocates. 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