Loading...
Not surprisingly, men already known to have a heart condition along with severe erectile dysfunction fare worst of all, the Australian researchers found. taking into account given information about ED its adviced to use viagra as a main remedy. For sure one can purchase viagra uk online. Generic viagra alternative will be cost cheaper if you purchase online. It can be embarrassing to talk to your doctor about your sex life, but it's the best way to get treated and get back to being intimate with your partner. Your doctor can pinpoint the source of the problem and may recommend lifestyle interventions like quitting smoking or losing weight.Anger can make the blood rush to your face, but not to the one place you need it when you want to have sex. It's not easy to feel romantic when you're raging, whether your anger is directed at your partner or not. Unexpressed anger or improperly expressed anger can contribute to performance problems in the bedroom. There is the antibiotics for sale is a well known drugs to treat infections. wide selection of generic antibiotics are available to keflex online on that website. When you don't like what you see in the mirror, it's easy to assume your partner isn't going to like the view, either. A negative self-image can make you worry not only about how you look, but also how well you're going to perform in bed. That performance anxiety can make you too anxious to even attempt sex. Majority of people estimate the value of cost as need good cheap antibiotics to treat various infeactions, that's why they put their belief on effectivness of generic antibiotics. Many different health conditions can affect the nerves, muscles, or blood flow that is needed to have an erection. Diabetes, high blood pressure, hardening of the arteries, spinal cord injuries, and multiple sclerosis can contribute to ED. Surgery to treat prostate or bladder problems can also affect the nerves and blood vessels that control an erection.
  • Sustainable Design in Action at a New Panama Eco-Resort

    Amble Resorts’ Premier Eco-Development Featured on GotSaga: Exclusive Interview with Benjamin Loomis

    The following article was originally published on GotSaga.com, a worldwide community of people with a passion for traveling and cultural diversity. View the post on GotSaga.com.

    Eco-development, Isla Palenque

    At the intersection of the natural world and the man-made world is sustainable design: an elegant expression of simplicity and functionality that allows humans to live respectfully within their natural surroundings.

    By growing my understanding of sustainable design and architecture, I’ve gained a better sense of how this philosophy makes beautiful, low-impact lifestyles possible in all sorts of different environments.

    Working for the eco-development company Amble Resorts gives me the chance to see environmentally-conscious design in action. I’m privy to a behind-the-scenes look at principles of sustainable design being used on Isla Palenque, the island home of Amble’s premier eco-resort in Panama. The company’s founder and president (and my boss) Benjamin Loomis has over twenty years of experience in the architecture, construction, and real estate industries; he studied sustainable building practices extensively in college, and he keeps up with new trends and innovations as they arise.

    I recently unleashed my curiosity about sustainable design on Ben:

    For starters, what’s the purpose of sustainable design?

    Benjamin Loomis: Sustainable design is about relating people with their natural environment. We’re actually trying to take this a step further by immersing people in the natural environment on Isla Palenque. And since the island comprises 400 acres of pristine jungle and beach ecosystems, it was paramount that we preserve the natural environment while creating structures that would allow our guests to get up close and personal with the nature and wildlife.

    What about Isla Palenque made you decide to build an eco-resort there? Was there a defining moment or specific discovery?

    BL: No, there wasn’t a specific moment or discovery as far as deciding to build an eco-resort, because in 2007 I went searching for properties with the goal of building an eco-resort in mind. I knew I wanted a spectacular location in which people would realize ecological significance through travel. I scouted out a number of different properties in Central America before finding Isla Palenque, and its unspoiled wilderness reminded me that luxury isn’t what you build – luxury is being immersed in nature in a comfortable way.

    Did you set goals for sustainability before you began planning the eco-development?

    BL: We wanted to leave most of the island’s 400 acres completely untouched, most especially the raw, untamed jungle and lagoon ecosystems. A portion of the island had been previously cleared for cattle, so the development is most concentrated there. That way we don’t have to do any intrusive clearing. I’m happy to say that our master plan allows for about 95% of the wilderness on Isla Palenque to remain unbuilt and well over two-thirds of it completely undisturbed, and you can see this plan in action on our construction site today – the trees stand tall while construction happens between them.

    For those of us who are first learning about sustainable design, what are some key terms to know?

    BL: I think concepts are more important than terms, especially since many of the “eco” terms we use today have taken on commercial definitions that weren’t part of their original meaning.

    That being said, eco-development is an important one. Eco-development is a broad “umbrella” concept that involves a core commitment to environmental and cultural sustainability.

    There’s some overlap between eco-development and sustainable design, but these concepts do not correlate in a simple linear or hierarchical fashion. For instance, an urban building can incorporate principles of sustainable design, but would not be considered an example of eco-development. And eco-development goes beyond just design strategies.

    Another term you’ll hear when sustainable design is being discussed: passive design. Passive design techniques are strategies to achieve human comfort through building design and layout, as opposed to more “active” (i.e. “mechanical”) means such as heating systems or A/C. Passive design techniques are a subset of sustainable design strategies.

    What’s a common misconception people have about sustainable design?

    BL: Actually, most people are unfamiliar with the concepts I’ve just mentioned, so there’s not much opportunity for misconceptions to arise. However, I can say that when first told about our design philosophy, a lot of people seem to think it would be difficult or impossible to achieve thermal comfort without using HVAC systems.

    We think our guests will be impressed by how effective passive cooling strategies can be when they don’t feel the need to use the A/C in their guestroom because the ocean breezes and shade are taking care of it naturally.

    On the other hand, an extreme climate like Panama’s really puts passive design strategies to the test, given its heat and humidity – so their skepticism is not wholly unjustified.

    What do you appreciate most about sustainable design?

    BL: I like that we can blur the boundaries between what is “designed” or “built” and what is natural. It allows us to create structures that work with the existing landscape, and bring people closer to their environment through the spaces they inhabit.

    It takes creativity and problem-solving to embrace sustainability as your design ethic, and I enjoy the challenge of responding to the site and to external forces.

    Eco-development, Isla Palenque

    It’s fun to work for a company whose mission is to answer to those who are endlessly curious about the world. Because as you can see from my questions, I had a lot to learn about sustainable design. With any artistic endeavor – whether it’s architecture & design, literature & writing, or film & cinematography – delving deeper often reveals a world of meaning that you never knew existed. And when it comes to eco-development, the often subtle but powerful ways that sustainable design allows us to live in harmony with our environments is worth appreciating. Who can argue with living beautifully while preserving the beauty of the wilds?

    TAGS:
    Posted on:



    Post by Rachel Kowalczyk

    Rachel is transported around the world every day through the storytelling of a group of travel writers she feels privileged to work with as Managing Editor for The Ambler. Meet Rachel >>

    More posts by Rachel Kowalczyk

    Leave a Comment


    3 Responses

    1. Rachel Rachel Kowalczyk says:

      Nestor, es tan amable. Si, hay muchas ventajas de trabajar con el bambu la guadua Colombiana! Gracias por sus felicitaciones agradables en The Ambler — esperamos que comentar de nuevo!

    2. Nestor Narvaez says:

      Excelente aporte que le esta haciendo a la humanidad Mr Ben Loomis, yo estoy trabajando con usted desde Colombia en su proyecto en Isla Palenque, utilizando una materia prima inexplorada por el mundo que es la Guadua Colombiana que es mas resistente y fino que el Bambu Chino y ademas no es madera es una graminia o pasto gigante, su aprovechamiento se hace entre sacas sin destruir el guadual, un 10% o 15% por ciento de materia prima es el aprovechamiento de esta materia prima y ademas solo se necesita esperar solo 4 años para tener una guadua fina y lista para la construcción. Hay muchas mas ventajas de trabajar con esta materia prima si necesita informacion, ahi esta mi email y mi numero celular es 3137223680 en Colombia.
      Lo felicito por tener como prioridad la NATURALEZA ante todo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    3. Bob Miller says:

      For those who want to do more than just help “reduce suffering” in communities where it is a daily struggle to survive, here is a webinar with a different SUSTAINABLE approach to consider.

      A free webinar about Sustainable Communities and their applications – for people who are interested in ideas about guiding impoverished communities (social and economic liabilities) to sustainable communities (social and economic assets) will be offered twice.
      Upcoming presentations will be:
      – July 31st at 6:00 P.M. Mountain time. For more details and to register go to: http://www.anymeeting.com/PIID=EF57DB82804A
      – August 7th at 9:00 A.M. Mountain time. For more details and to register go to: http://www.anymeeting.com/PIID=EF57DB82814C
      The webinars are free and nothing is being offered for sale. The presentation is about 25 minutes followed by time for questions, comments and suggestions. Audio will be via the computer (not telephone). Feel free to pass this information on to others who may be interested.

  • WP_Post Object
    (
        [ID] => 17886
        [post_author] => 46
        [post_date] => 2012-07-16 09:32:59
        [post_date_gmt] => 2012-07-16 14:32:59
        [post_content] => 

    Amble Resorts' Premier Eco-Development Featured on GotSaga: Exclusive Interview with Benjamin Loomis

    The following article was originally published on GotSaga.com, a worldwide community of people with a passion for traveling and cultural diversity. View the post on GotSaga.com. Eco-development, Isla Palenque At the intersection of the natural world and the man-made world is sustainable design: an elegant expression of simplicity and functionality that allows humans to live respectfully within their natural surroundings. By growing my understanding of sustainable design and architecture, I’ve gained a better sense of how this philosophy makes beautiful, low-impact lifestyles possible in all sorts of different environments. Working for the eco-development company Amble Resorts gives me the chance to see environmentally-conscious design in action. I’m privy to a behind-the-scenes look at principles of sustainable design being used on Isla Palenque, the island home of Amble’s premier eco-resort in Panama. The company’s founder and president (and my boss) Benjamin Loomis has over twenty years of experience in the architecture, construction, and real estate industries; he studied sustainable building practices extensively in college, and he keeps up with new trends and innovations as they arise. I recently unleashed my curiosity about sustainable design on Ben: For starters, what’s the purpose of sustainable design? Benjamin Loomis: Sustainable design is about relating people with their natural environment. We’re actually trying to take this a step further by immersing people in the natural environment on Isla Palenque. And since the island comprises 400 acres of pristine jungle and beach ecosystems, it was paramount that we preserve the natural environment while creating structures that would allow our guests to get up close and personal with the nature and wildlife. What about Isla Palenque made you decide to build an eco-resort there? Was there a defining moment or specific discovery? BL: No, there wasn’t a specific moment or discovery as far as deciding to build an eco-resort, because in 2007 I went searching for properties with the goal of building an eco-resort in mind. I knew I wanted a spectacular location in which people would realize ecological significance through travel. I scouted out a number of different properties in Central America before finding Isla Palenque, and its unspoiled wilderness reminded me that luxury isn’t what you build – luxury is being immersed in nature in a comfortable way. Did you set goals for sustainability before you began planning the eco-development? BL: We wanted to leave most of the island’s 400 acres completely untouched, most especially the raw, untamed jungle and lagoon ecosystems. A portion of the island had been previously cleared for cattle, so the development is most concentrated there. That way we don’t have to do any intrusive clearing. I’m happy to say that our master plan allows for about 95% of the wilderness on Isla Palenque to remain unbuilt and well over two-thirds of it completely undisturbed, and you can see this plan in action on our construction site today – the trees stand tall while construction happens between them. For those of us who are first learning about sustainable design, what are some key terms to know? BL: I think concepts are more important than terms, especially since many of the “eco” terms we use today have taken on commercial definitions that weren’t part of their original meaning. That being said, eco-development is an important one. Eco-development is a broad “umbrella” concept that involves a core commitment to environmental and cultural sustainability. There’s some overlap between eco-development and sustainable design, but these concepts do not correlate in a simple linear or hierarchical fashion. For instance, an urban building can incorporate principles of sustainable design, but would not be considered an example of eco-development. And eco-development goes beyond just design strategies. Another term you’ll hear when sustainable design is being discussed: passive design. Passive design techniques are strategies to achieve human comfort through building design and layout, as opposed to more “active” (i.e. “mechanical”) means such as heating systems or A/C. Passive design techniques are a subset of sustainable design strategies. What's a common misconception people have about sustainable design? BL: Actually, most people are unfamiliar with the concepts I’ve just mentioned, so there’s not much opportunity for misconceptions to arise. However, I can say that when first told about our design philosophy, a lot of people seem to think it would be difficult or impossible to achieve thermal comfort without using HVAC systems. We think our guests will be impressed by how effective passive cooling strategies can be when they don’t feel the need to use the A/C in their guestroom because the ocean breezes and shade are taking care of it naturally. On the other hand, an extreme climate like Panama’s really puts passive design strategies to the test, given its heat and humidity – so their skepticism is not wholly unjustified. What do you appreciate most about sustainable design? BL: I like that we can blur the boundaries between what is “designed” or “built” and what is natural. It allows us to create structures that work with the existing landscape, and bring people closer to their environment through the spaces they inhabit. It takes creativity and problem-solving to embrace sustainability as your design ethic, and I enjoy the challenge of responding to the site and to external forces. Eco-development, Isla Palenque It’s fun to work for a company whose mission is to answer to those who are endlessly curious about the world. Because as you can see from my questions, I had a lot to learn about sustainable design. With any artistic endeavor – whether it’s architecture & design, literature & writing, or film & cinematography – delving deeper often reveals a world of meaning that you never knew existed. And when it comes to eco-development, the often subtle but powerful ways that sustainable design allows us to live in harmony with our environments is worth appreciating. Who can argue with living beautifully while preserving the beauty of the wilds? [post_title] => Sustainable Design in Action at a New Panama Eco-Resort [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sustainable-design-in-action-at-a-new-panama-eco-resort [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-02-25 19:21:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-02-26 01:21:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://amble.com/ambler/?p=17886 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 3 [filter] => raw )

is_single=true

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 17886
    [post_author] => 46
    [post_date] => 2012-07-16 09:32:59
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-07-16 14:32:59
    [post_content] => 

Amble Resorts' Premier Eco-Development Featured on GotSaga: Exclusive Interview with Benjamin Loomis

The following article was originally published on GotSaga.com, a worldwide community of people with a passion for traveling and cultural diversity. View the post on GotSaga.com. Eco-development, Isla Palenque At the intersection of the natural world and the man-made world is sustainable design: an elegant expression of simplicity and functionality that allows humans to live respectfully within their natural surroundings. By growing my understanding of sustainable design and architecture, I’ve gained a better sense of how this philosophy makes beautiful, low-impact lifestyles possible in all sorts of different environments. Working for the eco-development company Amble Resorts gives me the chance to see environmentally-conscious design in action. I’m privy to a behind-the-scenes look at principles of sustainable design being used on Isla Palenque, the island home of Amble’s premier eco-resort in Panama. The company’s founder and president (and my boss) Benjamin Loomis has over twenty years of experience in the architecture, construction, and real estate industries; he studied sustainable building practices extensively in college, and he keeps up with new trends and innovations as they arise. I recently unleashed my curiosity about sustainable design on Ben: For starters, what’s the purpose of sustainable design? Benjamin Loomis: Sustainable design is about relating people with their natural environment. We’re actually trying to take this a step further by immersing people in the natural environment on Isla Palenque. And since the island comprises 400 acres of pristine jungle and beach ecosystems, it was paramount that we preserve the natural environment while creating structures that would allow our guests to get up close and personal with the nature and wildlife. What about Isla Palenque made you decide to build an eco-resort there? Was there a defining moment or specific discovery? BL: No, there wasn’t a specific moment or discovery as far as deciding to build an eco-resort, because in 2007 I went searching for properties with the goal of building an eco-resort in mind. I knew I wanted a spectacular location in which people would realize ecological significance through travel. I scouted out a number of different properties in Central America before finding Isla Palenque, and its unspoiled wilderness reminded me that luxury isn’t what you build – luxury is being immersed in nature in a comfortable way. Did you set goals for sustainability before you began planning the eco-development? BL: We wanted to leave most of the island’s 400 acres completely untouched, most especially the raw, untamed jungle and lagoon ecosystems. A portion of the island had been previously cleared for cattle, so the development is most concentrated there. That way we don’t have to do any intrusive clearing. I’m happy to say that our master plan allows for about 95% of the wilderness on Isla Palenque to remain unbuilt and well over two-thirds of it completely undisturbed, and you can see this plan in action on our construction site today – the trees stand tall while construction happens between them. For those of us who are first learning about sustainable design, what are some key terms to know? BL: I think concepts are more important than terms, especially since many of the “eco” terms we use today have taken on commercial definitions that weren’t part of their original meaning. That being said, eco-development is an important one. Eco-development is a broad “umbrella” concept that involves a core commitment to environmental and cultural sustainability. There’s some overlap between eco-development and sustainable design, but these concepts do not correlate in a simple linear or hierarchical fashion. For instance, an urban building can incorporate principles of sustainable design, but would not be considered an example of eco-development. And eco-development goes beyond just design strategies. Another term you’ll hear when sustainable design is being discussed: passive design. Passive design techniques are strategies to achieve human comfort through building design and layout, as opposed to more “active” (i.e. “mechanical”) means such as heating systems or A/C. Passive design techniques are a subset of sustainable design strategies. What's a common misconception people have about sustainable design? BL: Actually, most people are unfamiliar with the concepts I’ve just mentioned, so there’s not much opportunity for misconceptions to arise. However, I can say that when first told about our design philosophy, a lot of people seem to think it would be difficult or impossible to achieve thermal comfort without using HVAC systems. We think our guests will be impressed by how effective passive cooling strategies can be when they don’t feel the need to use the A/C in their guestroom because the ocean breezes and shade are taking care of it naturally. On the other hand, an extreme climate like Panama’s really puts passive design strategies to the test, given its heat and humidity – so their skepticism is not wholly unjustified. What do you appreciate most about sustainable design? BL: I like that we can blur the boundaries between what is “designed” or “built” and what is natural. It allows us to create structures that work with the existing landscape, and bring people closer to their environment through the spaces they inhabit. It takes creativity and problem-solving to embrace sustainability as your design ethic, and I enjoy the challenge of responding to the site and to external forces. Eco-development, Isla Palenque It’s fun to work for a company whose mission is to answer to those who are endlessly curious about the world. Because as you can see from my questions, I had a lot to learn about sustainable design. With any artistic endeavor – whether it’s architecture & design, literature & writing, or film & cinematography – delving deeper often reveals a world of meaning that you never knew existed. And when it comes to eco-development, the often subtle but powerful ways that sustainable design allows us to live in harmony with our environments is worth appreciating. Who can argue with living beautifully while preserving the beauty of the wilds? [post_title] => Sustainable Design in Action at a New Panama Eco-Resort [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sustainable-design-in-action-at-a-new-panama-eco-resort [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-02-25 19:21:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-02-26 01:21:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://amble.com/ambler/?p=17886 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 3 [filter] => raw )

is single