Loading...
It can be embarrassing to talk to your doctor about your sex life, but it's the best way to get treated and get back to being intimate with your partner. Your doctor can pinpoint the source of the problem and may recommend lifestyle interventions like quitting smoking or losing weight. Fellas: According to supplied information of erectile dysfunction it is suggested to apply silagra as a main treatment. You can always order silagra uk online. Generic silagra alternative will be much cheaper if you order online. Your doctor may recommend that you and your partner practice specific techniques to help delay ejaculation. These techniques may involve identifying and controlling the sensations that lead up to ejaculation and communicating to slow or stop stimulation. Other options include using a condom to reduce sensation to the penis or trying a different position (such as lying on your back) during intercourse. Counseling or behavioral therapy may help reduce anxiety related to premature ejaculation. Here is the antibiotics online is a well known meds to treat infections. huge selection of generic antibiotics are available to floxin online on that shoppie. Majority of guys estimate the value of cost as need of good cheap antibiotics to treat various infeactions, that's why they put their belief on effectivness of antibiotics online.
  • El Trapiche: A Panamanian Diner Serving “Típico” Classics

    Ben previously listed his top 3 restaurants for authentic dining in Panama City, and he still stands behind these – but when pressed to pare the list down further, El Trapiche earned his #1 recommendation. That’s why this comfortable diner was the locale for my first dinner out in Panama.

    El Trapiche, restaurants in Panama CityIf you’re seeking a fine dining experience, go elsewhere. But if you’re in a mood to sample a menu of delectable Panamanian favorites, all executed to perfection, head to El Trapiche on Via Argentina. Whatever this restaurant lacks in elegance, it compensates for with filling, flavorful food & unbeatable value.

    Granted, I’m the sort who loves a good 24-hour diner back home in Chicago – those accommodating places where the coffee warm-ups always arrive on time and the cook gets my eggs right: double-yolked, over-hard. From the moment we stepped onto El Trapiche’s pleasant breeze-blown outdoor patio, I felt at home.

    A peek through the shuttered windows revealed a laid-back indoor atmosphere and a clientele of mostly locals and families. I spotted a pair of old women laughing over a shared sandwich, enjoying prompt service from the friendly camarera who ministered to the indoor crowd wearing a quirky old-school waitress getup, teal with purple piping.

    To start off the meal, I order the ceviche mixto. It arrives in a cocktail glass brimming with camarones (tiny shrimp), cubed pulpo (octopus) and corvina (white sea bass) and bursting with flavor, its bite of lime accented by the addition of onions, habanero, salt, and pepper – a classic Panamanian version of this popular seafood appetizer, El Trapiche’s ceviche refreshes as it awakens the palate.

    Ceviche mixto, El Trapiche

    Next, we share plates of empanadas de maiz and classic carimañolas tapas-style, initiating me into that sinfully delicious thing Panama does with fried food. The meaty insides of the empanadas were spiced just right, but it was the carimañolas’ yuca outsides that really left an impression on me with their taste and texture unlike anything I’d ever tried before. Considering that the yuca root comes out of the ground hard as a rock, the melt-in-your-mouth consistency of these meaty little torpedoes is something to celebrate with seconds and thirds.

    By the time my chosen entree made it to the table, I was already running low on gutspace, but I pressed on with gusto — I’d been looking forward to my first taste of authentic Panamanian cuisine for quite some time, and with an array of appetizing dishes spread before me, I resigned myself to loosening the belt buckle another accommodating notch.

    I skipped over the white rice and cabbage flanking my ropa vieja and dove into the piping-hot heap of stewed beef speckled with peas, carrots, and onions. Usually an occasional carnivore at best, I practically devoured the entire helping of tender, savory meat. I almost felt bad for consuming it so quickly, since ropa vieja involves hours of stewing shredded skirt or flank steak in its own juices, along with tomato and spices, to erase every trace of toughness. Another score for El Trapiche — so far, the típico panameño menu items had dazzled without exception…

    Ropa vieja, El Trapiche

    …until I tried their plantain creations. The patacón I picked off Ben’s plate needed dipping sauce — too dry for my taste. A spear of fried plantain garnishing my ropa vieja went over a little better, as it hadn’t gone through the mashing process and consequently retained more moist freshness, but not much. If you want to sample all the staples of the Panamanian diet, hold it on the plaintains until you reach one of the high-end restaurants that pair their patacones with an assortment of dipping sauces, such as Don Patacón on Via Israel in the San Francisco district.

    Another caution (based on my one experience but corroborated by Ben’s numerous visits): you’ll find the outdoor waitstaff less attentive than the waitress I observed bustling around the big tables inside the El Trapiche restaurant. You get everything you ask for (extra silverware, hot sauce, the check…) in fairly short order, but you have to make your needs known, either to your table attendant or your waiter; both can summon a serviceable English if you’re unable to converse with them in Spanish.

    Their lag in anticipating my needs was noticeable, but no real nuisance – I’m not fussy when it comes to dining out. All I really care about is whether the food is good – and at El Trapiche, it most certainly is. Any of the entrees offered by El Trapiche at a comfortable price (under $10) will satisfy your appetite and sell you on Panamanian cuisine as something to be savored. And for my money, I can’t fathom a more charming environment than this low-key Panamanian diner, where your check is delivered with cough drops instead of starlight mints and a hippy waitress waves you off the patio with a smile, until next time.

    El Trapiche, Panamanian cuisineVisit El Trapiche

    Location: Vía Argentina at Avenida 2a B Norte
    Cost: inexpensive (entrees run $5-10). Credit cards and USD accepted (true of most establishments in Panama)
    Phone: 507-269-4353
    Be sure and try: the ceviche
    Skip: the patacones
    TAGS:
    Posted on:



    Post by Rachel Kowalczyk

    Rachel is transported around the world every day through the storytelling of a group of travel writers she feels privileged to work with as Managing Editor for The Ambler. Meet Rachel >>

    More posts by Rachel Kowalczyk

    Leave a Comment


    4 Responses

    1. Rachel Rachel Kowalczyk says:

      Emily — speaking of breakfast, I just realized I never managed to try hojaldres. Please arrange for me to taste-test both the sweet and savory varieties that will be offered at the resort’s restaurant!

    2. Rachel Rachel Kowalczyk says:

      Rebecca — there’s a fine line between overzealous and negligent service, and I also prefer it unbalanced on the hands-off Panama side. I’m looking forward to reviewing Las Rocas and Eden, the two restaurants that will open in conjunction with The Resort at Isla Palenque, to witness our resort’s camareros y camareras achieving the difficult feat of being invisible until needed.

    3. Just hearing the word “tipico” from a local makes my mouth water, and there’s no better place than Trapiche to get your fix …you described the experience perfectly, and have me wanting a carimanola for breakfast :).

    4. My husband, a native of Panama, and I had several conversations about the restaurant service. I’m very used to American servers, who are trained to anticipate your every want, but I have to say, towards the end of my month in Panama, a part of me grew to like the hands-off Panamanian style. I can’t count the number of great dinner conversations that have been interrupted in the States by a overly chipper server topping off my water yet again. My dinner conversations in Panama never lost their momentum due to the wait staff.

      This piece makes me so hungry for Panamanian food. Mmmm. Carimanolas!

  • WP_Post Object
    (
        [ID] => 19102
        [post_author] => 46
        [post_date] => 2012-08-16 11:19:33
        [post_date_gmt] => 2012-08-16 16:19:33
        [post_content] => Ben previously listed his top 3 restaurants for authentic dining in Panama City, and he still stands behind these – but when pressed to pare the list down further, El Trapiche earned his #1 recommendation. That’s why this comfortable diner was the locale for my first dinner out in Panama.
    
    El Trapiche, restaurants in Panama CityIf you’re seeking a fine dining experience, go elsewhere. But if you’re in a mood to sample a menu of delectable Panamanian favorites, all executed to perfection, head to El Trapiche on Via Argentina. Whatever this restaurant lacks in elegance, it compensates for with filling, flavorful food & unbeatable value.
    
    Granted, I’m the sort who loves a good 24-hour diner back home in Chicago – those accommodating places where the coffee warm-ups always arrive on time and the cook gets my eggs right: double-yolked, over-hard. From the moment we stepped onto El Trapiche’s pleasant breeze-blown outdoor patio, I felt at home.
    
    A peek through the shuttered windows revealed a laid-back indoor atmosphere and a clientele of mostly locals and families. I spotted a pair of old women laughing over a shared sandwich, enjoying prompt service from the friendly camarera who ministered to the indoor crowd wearing a quirky old-school waitress getup, teal with purple piping.
    
    To start off the meal, I order the ceviche mixto. It arrives in a cocktail glass brimming with camarones (tiny shrimp), cubed pulpo (octopus) and corvina (white sea bass) and bursting with flavor, its bite of lime accented by the addition of onions, habanero, salt, and pepper – a classic Panamanian version of this popular seafood appetizer, El Trapiche’s ceviche refreshes as it awakens the palate.
    
    Ceviche mixto, El Trapiche
    
    Next, we share plates of empanadas de maiz and classic carimañolas tapas-style, initiating me into that sinfully delicious thing Panama does with fried food. The meaty insides of the empanadas were spiced just right, but it was the carimañolas' yuca outsides that really left an impression on me with their taste and texture unlike anything I'd ever tried before. Considering that the yuca root comes out of the ground hard as a rock, the melt-in-your-mouth consistency of these meaty little torpedoes is something to celebrate with seconds and thirds.
    
    By the time my chosen entree made it to the table, I was already running low on gutspace, but I pressed on with gusto -- I'd been looking forward to my first taste of authentic Panamanian cuisine for quite some time, and with an array of appetizing dishes spread before me, I resigned myself to loosening the belt buckle another accommodating notch.
    
    I skipped over the white rice and cabbage flanking my ropa vieja and dove into the piping-hot heap of stewed beef speckled with peas, carrots, and onions. Usually an occasional carnivore at best, I practically devoured the entire helping of tender, savory meat. I almost felt bad for consuming it so quickly, since ropa vieja involves hours of stewing shredded skirt or flank steak in its own juices, along with tomato and spices, to erase every trace of toughness. Another score for El Trapiche -- so far, the típico panameño menu items had dazzled without exception…
    
    Ropa vieja, El Trapiche
    
    …until I tried their plantain creations. The patacón I picked off Ben's plate needed dipping sauce -- too dry for my taste. A spear of fried plantain garnishing my ropa vieja went over a little better, as it hadn't gone through the mashing process and consequently retained more moist freshness, but not much. If you want to sample all the staples of the Panamanian diet, hold it on the plaintains until you reach one of the high-end restaurants that pair their patacones with an assortment of dipping sauces, such as Don Patacón on Via Israel in the San Francisco district.
    
    Another caution (based on my one experience but corroborated by Ben’s numerous visits): you’ll find the outdoor waitstaff less attentive than the waitress I observed bustling around the big tables inside the El Trapiche restaurant. You get everything you ask for (extra silverware, hot sauce, the check…) in fairly short order, but you have to make your needs known, either to your table attendant or your waiter; both can summon a serviceable English if you’re unable to converse with them in Spanish.
    
    Their lag in anticipating my needs was noticeable, but no real nuisance – I’m not fussy when it comes to dining out. All I really care about is whether the food is good – and at El Trapiche, it most certainly is. Any of the entrees offered by El Trapiche at a comfortable price (under $10) will satisfy your appetite and sell you on Panamanian cuisine as something to be savored. And for my money, I can't fathom a more charming environment than this low-key Panamanian diner, where your check is delivered with cough drops instead of starlight mints and a hippy waitress waves you off the patio with a smile, until next time.
    
    El Trapiche, Panamanian cuisineVisit El Trapiche
    
    Location: Vía Argentina at Avenida 2a B Norte
    Cost: inexpensive (entrees run $5-10). Credit cards and USD accepted (true of most establishments in Panama)
    Phone: 507-269-4353
    Be sure and try: the ceviche
    Skip: the patacones
    [post_title] => El Trapiche: A Panamanian Diner Serving “Típico” Classics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => el-trapiche-a-panamanian-diner-serving-tipico-classics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-02-25 19:21:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-02-26 01:21:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://amble.com/ambler/?p=19102 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 4 [filter] => raw )

is_single=true

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 19102
    [post_author] => 46
    [post_date] => 2012-08-16 11:19:33
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-08-16 16:19:33
    [post_content] => Ben previously listed his top 3 restaurants for authentic dining in Panama City, and he still stands behind these – but when pressed to pare the list down further, El Trapiche earned his #1 recommendation. That’s why this comfortable diner was the locale for my first dinner out in Panama.

El Trapiche, restaurants in Panama CityIf you’re seeking a fine dining experience, go elsewhere. But if you’re in a mood to sample a menu of delectable Panamanian favorites, all executed to perfection, head to El Trapiche on Via Argentina. Whatever this restaurant lacks in elegance, it compensates for with filling, flavorful food & unbeatable value.

Granted, I’m the sort who loves a good 24-hour diner back home in Chicago – those accommodating places where the coffee warm-ups always arrive on time and the cook gets my eggs right: double-yolked, over-hard. From the moment we stepped onto El Trapiche’s pleasant breeze-blown outdoor patio, I felt at home.

A peek through the shuttered windows revealed a laid-back indoor atmosphere and a clientele of mostly locals and families. I spotted a pair of old women laughing over a shared sandwich, enjoying prompt service from the friendly camarera who ministered to the indoor crowd wearing a quirky old-school waitress getup, teal with purple piping.

To start off the meal, I order the ceviche mixto. It arrives in a cocktail glass brimming with camarones (tiny shrimp), cubed pulpo (octopus) and corvina (white sea bass) and bursting with flavor, its bite of lime accented by the addition of onions, habanero, salt, and pepper – a classic Panamanian version of this popular seafood appetizer, El Trapiche’s ceviche refreshes as it awakens the palate.

Ceviche mixto, El Trapiche

Next, we share plates of empanadas de maiz and classic carimañolas tapas-style, initiating me into that sinfully delicious thing Panama does with fried food. The meaty insides of the empanadas were spiced just right, but it was the carimañolas' yuca outsides that really left an impression on me with their taste and texture unlike anything I'd ever tried before. Considering that the yuca root comes out of the ground hard as a rock, the melt-in-your-mouth consistency of these meaty little torpedoes is something to celebrate with seconds and thirds.

By the time my chosen entree made it to the table, I was already running low on gutspace, but I pressed on with gusto -- I'd been looking forward to my first taste of authentic Panamanian cuisine for quite some time, and with an array of appetizing dishes spread before me, I resigned myself to loosening the belt buckle another accommodating notch.

I skipped over the white rice and cabbage flanking my ropa vieja and dove into the piping-hot heap of stewed beef speckled with peas, carrots, and onions. Usually an occasional carnivore at best, I practically devoured the entire helping of tender, savory meat. I almost felt bad for consuming it so quickly, since ropa vieja involves hours of stewing shredded skirt or flank steak in its own juices, along with tomato and spices, to erase every trace of toughness. Another score for El Trapiche -- so far, the típico panameño menu items had dazzled without exception…

Ropa vieja, El Trapiche

…until I tried their plantain creations. The patacón I picked off Ben's plate needed dipping sauce -- too dry for my taste. A spear of fried plantain garnishing my ropa vieja went over a little better, as it hadn't gone through the mashing process and consequently retained more moist freshness, but not much. If you want to sample all the staples of the Panamanian diet, hold it on the plaintains until you reach one of the high-end restaurants that pair their patacones with an assortment of dipping sauces, such as Don Patacón on Via Israel in the San Francisco district.

Another caution (based on my one experience but corroborated by Ben’s numerous visits): you’ll find the outdoor waitstaff less attentive than the waitress I observed bustling around the big tables inside the El Trapiche restaurant. You get everything you ask for (extra silverware, hot sauce, the check…) in fairly short order, but you have to make your needs known, either to your table attendant or your waiter; both can summon a serviceable English if you’re unable to converse with them in Spanish.

Their lag in anticipating my needs was noticeable, but no real nuisance – I’m not fussy when it comes to dining out. All I really care about is whether the food is good – and at El Trapiche, it most certainly is. Any of the entrees offered by El Trapiche at a comfortable price (under $10) will satisfy your appetite and sell you on Panamanian cuisine as something to be savored. And for my money, I can't fathom a more charming environment than this low-key Panamanian diner, where your check is delivered with cough drops instead of starlight mints and a hippy waitress waves you off the patio with a smile, until next time.

El Trapiche, Panamanian cuisineVisit El Trapiche
Location: Vía Argentina at Avenida 2a B Norte
Cost: inexpensive (entrees run $5-10). Credit cards and USD accepted (true of most establishments in Panama)
Phone: 507-269-4353
Be sure and try: the ceviche
Skip: the patacones
[post_title] => El Trapiche: A Panamanian Diner Serving “Típico” Classics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => el-trapiche-a-panamanian-diner-serving-tipico-classics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-02-25 19:21:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-02-26 01:21:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://amble.com/ambler/?p=19102 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 4 [filter] => raw )

is single