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  • “We Made It!”

    I’m sitting in my new “office,” and it’s loud.

    Why loud, you ask? Loud because my new office is about 250 feet from the boisterous surf of the Pacific Ocean.

    That’s right – I’m typing away on the balcony of my new oceanfront condo in Gorgona, Panama. A condo that has a 180-degree view of this gorgeous beach.

    Jacki Gillcash, life in Panama

    I can feel a bit of a sea breeze, but not much. It’s rainy season here in Panama, and while it has barely rained since we arrived a week ago – in fact, the sun shines more often than not – it is humid. I keep a fan blowing on me while I work.

    The journey to this point has been a long one – 18 months in the planning, to be precise. I often wonder, if I had known just how much work it would be to pack up my life and start a whole new one in another country, would I have started down the road in the first place?

    Maybe not. But probably. I’ve always been pretty ambitious, and when I get an idea in my head – well, look at where we are today. ‘Nuff said.

    And, of course, when I look up and I see this expanse of blue ocean in front of me, I realize that all the effort of the last year and a half has been worth it.

    *******

    So now it’s time to get down to brass tacks. That is, the business of settling into Panamanian life. The list of things we’ve done our first week is long, so here are just a few of the most notable:

    1. Gearing up for the beach – and surfing!

    The second we stepped over the condo’s threshold, our traveler’s exhaustion gave way to exhilaration – especially for our 11-year-old son, Angus. He’d never been to Panama before, unlike his mom and dad. Despite our repeated assurances that he’d love his new home, he remained skeptical up to our arrival.

    But as soon as he caught sight of the beach from our condo (which, by the way, is much larger than I remembered; plenty of room for guests) his doubts evaporated. The shoreline is just a pebble’s throw away.

    Life in Panama, living abroad

    Angus making himself right at home our first night in the condo.

    To make the most of the HUGE swells in front of our building, we wasted no time scoring boogie boards. Angus loves to ride out the biggest of the waves, but we’ve got to be very careful. At certain times of the day, the waves are just TOO big – even the locals stay ashore. That’s when we hit the pool!

    Within our first few days, we checked out a nearby surfing hotspot called El Palmar on a tip that we could find a good surf instructor there. Personally, I’m more interested in scuba diving (I’ll be looking into this soon), but the boys want to learn surfing ASAP, and I’ll certainly rest easier when Angus, my husband and I have heard from a pro how best to approach the tides and undertow.

    Panama beach, surfing

    The beach at El Palmar

    2. Swimming, swimming and more swimming…

    Yes, the waves are fun and the pool is gorgeous, but there’s a more practical reason why we’ve been spending so much time in the water – THE HEAT. The thermometer may only show high 80s or low 90s, but we’re in the middle of Panama’s rainy season, which means some killer humidity that acts to intensify the heat.

    Perhaps because we’re from Canada and not Arizona, the unbelievable heat is the one aspect of our new life that requires a big adjustment on our part. It is very tempting to run the A/C 24/7, but that’s very expensive (and very eco-unfriendly). So we contain ourselves – we’ve adopted a pattern of running it during the dinner hour while I cook, and then again a couple of hours before bedtime. During the day, all fans are running all the time and we open the windows and doors wide to let the ocean breezes flow through the place.

    But even then, IT IS JUST SO HOT.

    Not that we’re complaining – we love it. Between the pool and the ocean, we swim about four times a day. And after only one week, we are already getting used to the heat (yes, your body does acclimate).

    3. Stocking up

    Even though our condo came fully-loaded with all the basics, one of our first orders of business was to stock the fridge. There is no shortage of nearby stores selling everything, from food and beverage, to furniture and building supplies, to beachwear and souvenirs. Grocery shopping in Panama left us amazed at the prices — we filled our cart with everything we needed and paid less than half what it would have cost in Canada. At Panama’s answer to Costco, the PriceMart in Panama City, we found good deals on staple items like cereal and toilet paper, but not-so-great deals on wine, which was comparable in price to Canada since they appear to stock only very fine wine. We didn’t pick up any seafood at the store – for that, we’ll be heading to the fresh fish market just down the beach!

    4. Securing transportation

    One of the more practical items on our Week 1 checklist: to pick up our rental car at the all-inclusive resort about a half-hour away. Our lovely realtor arranged for a good friend to drive us there on our first morning in Panama.

    A vehicle is critical to our everyday lives here. All the shops are only a five-minute highway drive away, but still too far to walk. Even getting our son to school every morning requires a car, since it is too far to walk.

    So we have roughly two weeks to find a permanent vehicle. Yuck. Not a task I enjoy at all. But absolutely key, especially since we’re looking forward to fully exploring this beautiful country. We’ve begun looking around and figure we can get something decent for $7,000 to $8,000. Nothing fancy, but suitable for our (mostly local) needs.

    Related side note: I WON’T be driving in Panama City anytime soon. It is not for the faint of heart. The rules of the road as we know them in North America don’t seem to exist on the streets of the bustling capital – it’s every woman for herself! Everyone tells us “You get used to it.” I’m not so sure.

    5. Getting acclimated to life with a spectacular view

    So far, life in our new “neighborhood” is nice and quiet. On the weekends, the place fills up a bit – turns out, this is a popular getaway for a lot of locals, and we’ll see how busy it gets during the winter months when the tourists show up.

    But nobody can touch the creme-de-la-creme of this place; it’s on our balcony. THE VIEW. Every day, I feel new wonder at the fact that this is now our backyard. I have been trying to wrap my head around the reality that we’re not visitors on vacation, this is our casa. But it still hasn’t sunk in. I’m still in awe.

    Life in Panama, living abroad

    More reasons I’m already loving my new life in Panama:

    (stuff I knew from research that is already proving to be true)

    • Helpful, friendly folks: Local expat Jim, an ex-cop from D.C., has passed along the name of his Spanish teacher so we can sign up for $5/hour lessons. Can’t beat that! And he’s also a surfing instructor! So we’re going to try and work out a deal for both.
    • Convenient & affordable healthcare: We’ll be taking our general health concerns to a good doctor at a nearby clinic that charges between $7-$15 for a consultation.
    • Legal help: We have begun the process of looking into the new Permanent Residency visa with the help of a local lawyer. For the time being, our tourist visa suits our needs quite well.

    Explore The Ambler

    Check out Jacki’s previous posts — when you see how long this move has been in the making, you’ll want to congratulate her for pulling it off! We certainly do! From all of us at The Resort at Isla Palenque — WELCOME TO PANAMA, JACKI & FAMILY!
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    Posted on:



    Post by Jacki Gillcash

    Jacki is an award-winning journalist and freelance writer, a mother, traveler, and soon-to-be permanent resident of Panama! Meet Jacki>>

    More posts by Jacki Gillcash

    Leave a Comment


    2 Responses

    1. Jacki Gillcash Jacki Gillcash says:

      Emily: Where are you located in Panama? We’re always looking to network with other expats, no matter where they live. How do we find you? 🙂

    2. Congrats Jacki and family! The more time I spend in Panama, the more I love it …so I can honestly say that (aside from car shopping ;)) it’s just going to get better from here! Let us know if you need anything.

  • WP_Post Object
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        [ID] => 19143
        [post_author] => 34
        [post_date] => 2012-08-17 07:52:50
        [post_date_gmt] => 2012-08-17 12:52:50
        [post_content] => I’m sitting in my new “office,” and it’s loud.
    
    Why loud, you ask? Loud because my new office is about 250 feet from the boisterous surf of the Pacific Ocean.
    
    That’s right – I’m typing away on the balcony of my new oceanfront condo in Gorgona, Panama. A condo that has a 180-degree view of this gorgeous beach.
    
    Jacki Gillcash, life in Panama
    
    I can feel a bit of a sea breeze, but not much. It’s rainy season here in Panama, and while it has barely rained since we arrived a week ago – in fact, the sun shines more often than not – it is humid. I keep a fan blowing on me while I work.
    
    The journey to this point has been a long one – 18 months in the planning, to be precise. I often wonder, if I had known just how much work it would be to pack up my life and start a whole new one in another country, would I have started down the road in the first place?
    
    Maybe not. But probably. I’ve always been pretty ambitious, and when I get an idea in my head – well, look at where we are today. ‘Nuff said.
    
    And, of course, when I look up and I see this expanse of blue ocean in front of me, I realize that all the effort of the last year and a half has been worth it.
    

    *******

    So now it’s time to get down to brass tacks. That is, the business of settling into Panamanian life. The list of things we’ve done our first week is long, so here are just a few of the most notable:

    1. Gearing up for the beach – and surfing!

    The second we stepped over the condo’s threshold, our traveler’s exhaustion gave way to exhilaration – especially for our 11-year-old son, Angus. He’d never been to Panama before, unlike his mom and dad. Despite our repeated assurances that he’d love his new home, he remained skeptical up to our arrival. But as soon as he caught sight of the beach from our condo (which, by the way, is much larger than I remembered; plenty of room for guests) his doubts evaporated. The shoreline is just a pebble’s throw away. [caption id="attachment_19164" align="aligncenter" width="600" caption="Angus making himself right at home our first night in the condo."]Life in Panama, living abroad[/caption] To make the most of the HUGE swells in front of our building, we wasted no time scoring boogie boards. Angus loves to ride out the biggest of the waves, but we’ve got to be very careful. At certain times of the day, the waves are just TOO big – even the locals stay ashore. That’s when we hit the pool! Within our first few days, we checked out a nearby surfing hotspot called El Palmar on a tip that we could find a good surf instructor there. Personally, I’m more interested in scuba diving (I’ll be looking into this soon), but the boys want to learn surfing ASAP, and I’ll certainly rest easier when Angus, my husband and I have heard from a pro how best to approach the tides and undertow. [caption id="attachment_19157" align="aligncenter" width="600" caption="The beach at El Palmar"]Panama beach, surfing[/caption]

    2. Swimming, swimming and more swimming…

    Yes, the waves are fun and the pool is gorgeous, but there’s a more practical reason why we’ve been spending so much time in the water – THE HEAT. The thermometer may only show high 80s or low 90s, but we're in the middle of Panama’s rainy season, which means some killer humidity that acts to intensify the heat. Perhaps because we’re from Canada and not Arizona, the unbelievable heat is the one aspect of our new life that requires a big adjustment on our part. It is very tempting to run the A/C 24/7, but that’s very expensive (and very eco-unfriendly). So we contain ourselves – we’ve adopted a pattern of running it during the dinner hour while I cook, and then again a couple of hours before bedtime. During the day, all fans are running all the time and we open the windows and doors wide to let the ocean breezes flow through the place. But even then, IT IS JUST SO HOT. Not that we’re complaining – we love it. Between the pool and the ocean, we swim about four times a day. And after only one week, we are already getting used to the heat (yes, your body does acclimate).

    3. Stocking up

    Even though our condo came fully-loaded with all the basics, one of our first orders of business was to stock the fridge. There is no shortage of nearby stores selling everything, from food and beverage, to furniture and building supplies, to beachwear and souvenirs. Grocery shopping in Panama left us amazed at the prices -- we filled our cart with everything we needed and paid less than half what it would have cost in Canada. At Panama’s answer to Costco, the PriceMart in Panama City, we found good deals on staple items like cereal and toilet paper, but not-so-great deals on wine, which was comparable in price to Canada since they appear to stock only very fine wine. We didn’t pick up any seafood at the store – for that, we’ll be heading to the fresh fish market just down the beach!

    4. Securing transportation

    One of the more practical items on our Week 1 checklist: to pick up our rental car at the all-inclusive resort about a half-hour away. Our lovely realtor arranged for a good friend to drive us there on our first morning in Panama. A vehicle is critical to our everyday lives here. All the shops are only a five-minute highway drive away, but still too far to walk. Even getting our son to school every morning requires a car, since it is too far to walk. So we have roughly two weeks to find a permanent vehicle. Yuck. Not a task I enjoy at all. But absolutely key, especially since we’re looking forward to fully exploring this beautiful country. We’ve begun looking around and figure we can get something decent for $7,000 to $8,000. Nothing fancy, but suitable for our (mostly local) needs. Related side note: I WON’T be driving in Panama City anytime soon. It is not for the faint of heart. The rules of the road as we know them in North America don’t seem to exist on the streets of the bustling capital – it’s every woman for herself! Everyone tells us “You get used to it.” I’m not so sure.

    5. Getting acclimated to life with a spectacular view

    So far, life in our new “neighborhood” is nice and quiet. On the weekends, the place fills up a bit – turns out, this is a popular getaway for a lot of locals, and we’ll see how busy it gets during the winter months when the tourists show up. But nobody can touch the creme-de-la-creme of this place; it's on our balcony. THE VIEW. Every day, I feel new wonder at the fact that this is now our backyard. I have been trying to wrap my head around the reality that we’re not visitors on vacation, this is our casa. But it still hasn't sunk in. I’m still in awe. Life in Panama, living abroad More reasons I’m already loving my new life in Panama: (stuff I knew from research that is already proving to be true)
    • Helpful, friendly folks: Local expat Jim, an ex-cop from D.C., has passed along the name of his Spanish teacher so we can sign up for $5/hour lessons. Can't beat that! And he’s also a surfing instructor! So we're going to try and work out a deal for both.
    • Convenient & affordable healthcare: We’ll be taking our general health concerns to a good doctor at a nearby clinic that charges between $7-$15 for a consultation.
    • Legal help: We have begun the process of looking into the new Permanent Residency visa with the help of a local lawyer. For the time being, our tourist visa suits our needs quite well.
    Explore The Ambler
    Check out Jacki's previous posts -- when you see how long this move has been in the making, you'll want to congratulate her for pulling it off! We certainly do! From all of us at The Resort at Isla Palenque -- WELCOME TO PANAMA, JACKI & FAMILY!
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    [post_date] => 2012-08-17 07:52:50
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    [post_content] => I’m sitting in my new “office,” and it’s loud.

Why loud, you ask? Loud because my new office is about 250 feet from the boisterous surf of the Pacific Ocean.

That’s right – I’m typing away on the balcony of my new oceanfront condo in Gorgona, Panama. A condo that has a 180-degree view of this gorgeous beach.

Jacki Gillcash, life in Panama

I can feel a bit of a sea breeze, but not much. It’s rainy season here in Panama, and while it has barely rained since we arrived a week ago – in fact, the sun shines more often than not – it is humid. I keep a fan blowing on me while I work.

The journey to this point has been a long one – 18 months in the planning, to be precise. I often wonder, if I had known just how much work it would be to pack up my life and start a whole new one in another country, would I have started down the road in the first place?

Maybe not. But probably. I’ve always been pretty ambitious, and when I get an idea in my head – well, look at where we are today. ‘Nuff said.

And, of course, when I look up and I see this expanse of blue ocean in front of me, I realize that all the effort of the last year and a half has been worth it.

*******

So now it’s time to get down to brass tacks. That is, the business of settling into Panamanian life. The list of things we’ve done our first week is long, so here are just a few of the most notable:

1. Gearing up for the beach – and surfing!

The second we stepped over the condo’s threshold, our traveler’s exhaustion gave way to exhilaration – especially for our 11-year-old son, Angus. He’d never been to Panama before, unlike his mom and dad. Despite our repeated assurances that he’d love his new home, he remained skeptical up to our arrival. But as soon as he caught sight of the beach from our condo (which, by the way, is much larger than I remembered; plenty of room for guests) his doubts evaporated. The shoreline is just a pebble’s throw away. [caption id="attachment_19164" align="aligncenter" width="600" caption="Angus making himself right at home our first night in the condo."]Life in Panama, living abroad[/caption] To make the most of the HUGE swells in front of our building, we wasted no time scoring boogie boards. Angus loves to ride out the biggest of the waves, but we’ve got to be very careful. At certain times of the day, the waves are just TOO big – even the locals stay ashore. That’s when we hit the pool! Within our first few days, we checked out a nearby surfing hotspot called El Palmar on a tip that we could find a good surf instructor there. Personally, I’m more interested in scuba diving (I’ll be looking into this soon), but the boys want to learn surfing ASAP, and I’ll certainly rest easier when Angus, my husband and I have heard from a pro how best to approach the tides and undertow. [caption id="attachment_19157" align="aligncenter" width="600" caption="The beach at El Palmar"]Panama beach, surfing[/caption]

2. Swimming, swimming and more swimming…

Yes, the waves are fun and the pool is gorgeous, but there’s a more practical reason why we’ve been spending so much time in the water – THE HEAT. The thermometer may only show high 80s or low 90s, but we're in the middle of Panama’s rainy season, which means some killer humidity that acts to intensify the heat. Perhaps because we’re from Canada and not Arizona, the unbelievable heat is the one aspect of our new life that requires a big adjustment on our part. It is very tempting to run the A/C 24/7, but that’s very expensive (and very eco-unfriendly). So we contain ourselves – we’ve adopted a pattern of running it during the dinner hour while I cook, and then again a couple of hours before bedtime. During the day, all fans are running all the time and we open the windows and doors wide to let the ocean breezes flow through the place. But even then, IT IS JUST SO HOT. Not that we’re complaining – we love it. Between the pool and the ocean, we swim about four times a day. And after only one week, we are already getting used to the heat (yes, your body does acclimate).

3. Stocking up

Even though our condo came fully-loaded with all the basics, one of our first orders of business was to stock the fridge. There is no shortage of nearby stores selling everything, from food and beverage, to furniture and building supplies, to beachwear and souvenirs. Grocery shopping in Panama left us amazed at the prices -- we filled our cart with everything we needed and paid less than half what it would have cost in Canada. At Panama’s answer to Costco, the PriceMart in Panama City, we found good deals on staple items like cereal and toilet paper, but not-so-great deals on wine, which was comparable in price to Canada since they appear to stock only very fine wine. We didn’t pick up any seafood at the store – for that, we’ll be heading to the fresh fish market just down the beach!

4. Securing transportation

One of the more practical items on our Week 1 checklist: to pick up our rental car at the all-inclusive resort about a half-hour away. Our lovely realtor arranged for a good friend to drive us there on our first morning in Panama. A vehicle is critical to our everyday lives here. All the shops are only a five-minute highway drive away, but still too far to walk. Even getting our son to school every morning requires a car, since it is too far to walk. So we have roughly two weeks to find a permanent vehicle. Yuck. Not a task I enjoy at all. But absolutely key, especially since we’re looking forward to fully exploring this beautiful country. We’ve begun looking around and figure we can get something decent for $7,000 to $8,000. Nothing fancy, but suitable for our (mostly local) needs. Related side note: I WON’T be driving in Panama City anytime soon. It is not for the faint of heart. The rules of the road as we know them in North America don’t seem to exist on the streets of the bustling capital – it’s every woman for herself! Everyone tells us “You get used to it.” I’m not so sure.

5. Getting acclimated to life with a spectacular view

So far, life in our new “neighborhood” is nice and quiet. On the weekends, the place fills up a bit – turns out, this is a popular getaway for a lot of locals, and we’ll see how busy it gets during the winter months when the tourists show up. But nobody can touch the creme-de-la-creme of this place; it's on our balcony. THE VIEW. Every day, I feel new wonder at the fact that this is now our backyard. I have been trying to wrap my head around the reality that we’re not visitors on vacation, this is our casa. But it still hasn't sunk in. I’m still in awe. Life in Panama, living abroad More reasons I’m already loving my new life in Panama: (stuff I knew from research that is already proving to be true) Explore The Ambler
Check out Jacki's previous posts -- when you see how long this move has been in the making, you'll want to congratulate her for pulling it off! We certainly do! From all of us at The Resort at Isla Palenque -- WELCOME TO PANAMA, JACKI & FAMILY!
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is single